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Given an object, how do we check if a class is Singleton or not?

Currently I am using this

public class SingletonClass implements IsSingleton

where IsSingleton is a blank interface which I implement on singleton classes. So the class can be tested as singleton

SingletonClass obj = SingletonClass.getInstance();
if(obj instanceof IsSingleton)
    System.out.println("Class is Singleton");
else
    System.err.println("Class not singleton");

Is there a better way to determine a Singleton class. I have tried my way through reflection but the problem there is getConstructors() return only declared public classes. So it will treat a class without a declared constructor as Singleton.

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i'm not a java expert but if theres a way to programmatically test if an object's constructor is private or not (via reflection, probably), thats how i'd have tested it. – Kristian May 18 '12 at 16:44
4  
@Kristian - there is a way to test for that, but a private constructor does not guarantee that a class is a singleton. you could still construct as many as you want through a static method on said object. – jtahlborn May 18 '12 at 16:46
1  
Having a private constructor does not necessarily mean the class is implemented as a singleton. – birryree May 18 '12 at 16:46
1  
If all your singletons are going to be implementing the IsSingleton interface, then yes, that's a much more accurate method to do what you want, if the classes follow the contract of the interface. But a class can still break your interface contract and do its own stuff to not be a singleton. You might want to use an abstract class instead. – birryree May 18 '12 at 16:52
2  
May I ask why you'd like to know if it's a singleton? There's a decent chance there's a more "Java-y" way to look at the problem. – yshavit May 18 '12 at 18:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Singleton is a semantic definition, one this is not generally testable thru code. No interface or any other scheme can guarantee that the class operates solely as a singleton.

Because of this (semantic nature) it would be better IMO to create a custom annotation to indicate this feature

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+1 for clearer explanation. – Nitin Chhajer May 18 '12 at 17:09

there is no general way to know programmatically if a class is a singleton or not.

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This looks very complicated.

Java supports "instanceof"

SingletonClass obj = SingletonClass.getInstance();
if(obj instanceof IsSingleton)
    System.out.println("Class is Singleton");
else
    System.err.println("Class not singleton");
share|improve this answer

instanceof should work with interfaces.

SingletonClass obj = SingletonClass.getInstance();

if (obj instanceof IsSingleton)
    System.out.println("Yay !");

But be careful !

http://www.xyzws.com/Javafaq/how-does-instanceof-work-with-interface/67

This will not work if the object is from a final class, like String. For your custom classes, as long as you don't make the class itself final, it should be fine.

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I think this may help you.... Whenever any object is created in the memory, there is always a hashcode associated with it. This hashcode is calculated by a mathematical operation using few parameters, such as starting memory allocation address.So, if you will call hashcode() on any object any number of times, it's going to return the same hashcode. So, simply call the method which is returning your expected singleton type of object and call hashcode() method on it. If it prints the same hashcode each time, it means it's singleton, else it's not.

Lot of people are saying that instanceof keyword can help decide you whether an object is singleton ot not. But, I really don't understand how is this possible? instanceof just lets us examine whether the instance is of any particular class . So, if there are multiple instances of class A and they are not created by singleton pattern, then checking instanceof for any of them is always going to return true. But, it can't be called as singleton because, separate instance exists for each object in the memory.

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