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struct Test
{
    Test()
    {}

    Test(const Test& other)
    {
        cout << "Copy" << endl;
    }

    Test(Test&& other)  
    {
        cout << "Move" << endl;
    }
};

Test* f()
{
    static Test t;
    return &t;
}

int main()
{   
    auto t = *f();
    return 0;
}

Output is: Copy

*f() is obviously an anonymous temporary object so that it should be an r-value and the move-constructor should be called. Why does the compiler treat *f() as an l-value?

Is it a bug of the compiler, or my understanding wrong?

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10  
"*f() is obviously an anonymous temporary object so that it should be an r-value" No it isn't; your assumptions are flawed. –  ildjarn May 18 '12 at 17:00
3  
*f() isn't even an object, it's a reference. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 18 '12 at 17:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The result of f() is an anonymous temporary object of type Test*. f() is an rvalue.

*f() performs indirection through said pointer. As is always the case when using the indirection operator, the result is an lvalue.

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The result of f() is a value of type Test*, not a temporary object. Scalar temporaries are extremely seldom in C++; the only place I've encountered them is passing 42 to a function with a const int& parameter. –  FredOverflow Jul 8 '12 at 9:59

Why does the compiler treat *f() as an l-value?

Because it is an l-value. The result of operator* when applied to a pointer is always an l-value. And you cannot implicitly move from an l-value.

Remember the golden rule with movement: movement can only happen if it is guaranteed to be safe (for a certain definition of "guaranteed").

Look at your code. Is it obvious that the object that you want to move from is going to be destroyed and is inaccessible after the move? If not, then you must use std::move to move from it; this tells the system that you are taking responsibility for any screw-ups that happen because of movement.

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Actually, the return of f() is a pointer. Dereferencing a pointer does not cause a new object to spring into existence. However, you are copying whatever happens to be at the memory address that the return value points to into t. I would certainly expect a copy in this case.

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"*f() is obviously an anonymous temporary object..."

No it's not! It's a static object.

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Test f()
{
    return Test();
}

int main()
{   
    auto t = f();
    return 0;
}

Now you're returning an anonymous temporary - the clue is creating a temporary and returning it by value without binding it to name.

What you're doing, as everyone else correctly noted, is returning a pointer to a static (so non-temporary) named (so not anonymous) object. The pointer may be an anonymous temporary, but the thing it points to is not.

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