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I need an automated way to add a line to a configuration file. I used diff to create a .diff file that I want to apply with patch. However, it can happen that the file that I need to patch is slightly modified elsewhere. E.g. elsewhere in the configuration file some other line has been added.

I assumed that patch would actually be smart about this and figure out if the patch could still be applied without conflicts, but I am getting an error whenever I try to apply the patch to a config file that is slightly different from the original file.

Are there any additional flags that I need to pass to patch or diff to make it less strict? I am generating the .diff file using

diff -ruN oldfile.conf newfile.conf > mypatch.diff

And then apply the patch using

patch myconfig.conf mypatch.diff

What I would like is that patch will try to apply the patch fairly liberally, and if it doesn't know how, just return a warning, but not an error. Currently I am seeing these errors:

jeroen@jeroen-ubuntu:~/Desktop$ diff -ruN default.conf default_new.conf > mypatch.diff
jeroen@jeroen-ubuntu:~/Desktop$ patch default2.conf mypatch.diff 
patching file default2.conf
Hunk #1 FAILED at 28.
1 out of 1 hunk FAILED -- saving rejects to file default2.conf.rej
jeroen@jeroen-ubuntu:~/Desktop$
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what error you are actually getting? –  ravi May 18 '12 at 17:37
    
Hunk #1 FAILED at ... –  Jeroen May 18 '12 at 17:42
    
If you only want to add a line, why not write a simple script that adds a line? –  m0skit0 May 18 '12 at 17:46
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assumed that patch would actually be smart about this and figure out if the patch could still be applied without conflicts, but I am getting an error whenever I try to apply the patch to a config file that is slightly different from the original file.

Actually, that holds. However, it greatly depends on your definition "slightly different". Basically, changes need to be far from the place modified by the patch.

You can try calling patch with the -F argument

-F num or --fuzz=num

Set the maximum fuzz factor. This option only applies to diffs that have context, and causes patch to ignore up to that many lines of con- text in looking for places to install a hunk. Note that a larger fuzz factor increases the odds of a faulty patch. The default fuzz fac- tor is 2. A fuzz factor greater than or equal to the number of lines of context in the context diff, ordinarily 3, ignores all context.

But I wouldn't advise it.

If you just want

an automated way to add a line to a configuration file

did you consider using perl, awk or ed for the job? I don't think patch is the right tool for it.

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Is there an easy way to have patch not return an error if it doesn't work? –  Jeroen May 18 '12 at 19:01
    
@Jeroen: You mean something like patch ... || true? –  jpalecek May 18 '12 at 20:50
    
does that work inside a shell script? –  Jeroen May 18 '12 at 22:33
    
@Jeroen: Yes, only in a shell script. –  jpalecek May 18 '12 at 22:48
    
Interesting. Is that different from patch ... 2> /dev/null ? –  Jeroen May 18 '12 at 23:11
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