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Why does this not work?

def straight(ranks):
    "Return True if the ordered ranks form a 5-card straight."
    return range(max(ranks)-4, max(ranks)+1) == ranks.sort()

Assuming ranks is:

>>> ranks = [9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
>>> range(max(ranks)-4, max(ranks)+1)
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> ranks.sort()
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Then why is:

>>> range(max(s)-4,max(s)+1) == s.sort()
False
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

s.sort() returns None because it sorts the list in place. Use sorted(s).

>>> s = [1,3,2]
>>> repr(s.sort())
'None'
>>> repr(s)
'[1, 2, 3]'
>>> repr(sorted(s))
'[1, 2, 3]'
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1  
Yes, reversed() is the "create a new one" version; .reverse() is in-place. –  Amber May 18 '12 at 18:28
1  
Yes, you need list(reversed(ranks)) to turn it into a list. –  kindall May 18 '12 at 18:36
2  
@Verbal_Kint: Because if you just want to iterate over the list in reverse order, it's faster and uses less memory than creating a whole new list. –  kindall May 18 '12 at 18:39
1  
@kindall So reversed returns a kind of generator object? (in this case called a listreverseiterator object) –  Verbal_Kint May 18 '12 at 18:40
2  
@Verbal_Kint: Yes, exactly. –  kindall May 18 '12 at 18:41

because ranks.sort() is equal to None. use sorted(ranks) for comparison.

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rank.sort() sorts in the list in place so returns None...use sorted() if you want a list returned.

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