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Can static variables be initialized in a method? Is the following code valid? Thank you!

internal static class Common
{

    internal static int TimeOut;
    internal static string Name;


    internal static void Initialize()
    {
        TimeOut = Config.Read("timeout");
        Name = Config.Read("Name");
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Oded, Nathan Taylor, L.B, Enigma State, bmargulies May 18 '12 at 22:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Did you try it? – 500 - Internal Server Error May 18 '12 at 18:56
4  
What does your compiler tell you? – BoltClock May 18 '12 at 18:56
4  
In the amount of time it took you to post this, you could have put this code in your IDE and try to compile it 5 times over. – Oded May 18 '12 at 18:56
1  
Side note, I've seen this done with some really strange exceptions happening. It can also make it hard to mock the type for unit testing, if it matters. – Yuriy Faktorovich May 18 '12 at 18:59
    
Being a big believer in dependency injection, this absolutely makes me cringe. The only thing worse than a static class is a static class requiring you to call some kind of static initialize method before you use it! – Steven Doggart May 18 '12 at 19:01
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, they can. Your code is perfectly valid.

That being said, it's often better to initialize then in a static constructor, or inline, as it prevents them from being used and accessed prior to initialization.

In your case, this would require using a static constructor, as you're running code (Config.Read):

static Common()
{
    TimeOut = Config.Read("timeout");
    Name = Config.Read("Name");
}

I would also recommend using Properties instead of Fields for your static values, as this does provide some benefits, especially in terms of future-proofing your API. This can be as simple as:

internal static int TimeOut { get; set; }
internal static string Name { get; set; }

In your case, since these appear to be read once at initialization, you could potentially also use:

internal static int TimeOut { get; private set; }
internal static string Name { get; private set; }
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The short answer is yes.

If you truly want to initialize static variables (as in, set their value at runtime before the static class is used), use a static constructor:

internal static class Common
{
    internal static int TimeOut;
    internal static string Name;

    static Common()
    {
        TimeOut = Config.Read("timeout");
        Name = Config.Read("Name");
    }
}

Note, static constructors have no access modifier and must be parameter-less.

For further reading on static constructors, see this MSDN article.

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