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I need to write a program to generate some random numbers without having two numbers fall in a certain range. Unfortunately, I need to do it at school and the only language I can use on the computers is Java (I would otherwise do it in C++). I know very little Java, and my program is giving me a stack overflow after generating 20 or so numbers. Could someone please explain why? The program is somewhat ugly, but I really need it ready in a hurry.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class RandomNumbers {
public static int GenerateNumber(int previousNumber, int[] numberUsed) {
    Random random = new Random();
    int number = random.nextInt(39);
    if (previousNumber >= 1 && previousNumber <= 9) {
        while (number >= 1 && number <= 9)
            number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
    } else if (previousNumber >= 10 && previousNumber <= 17) {
        while (number >= 10 && previousNumber <= 17)
            number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
    } else if (previousNumber >= 18 && previousNumber <= 32) {
        while (number >= 18 && previousNumber <= 32)
            number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
    } else if (previousNumber >= 33 && previousNumber <= 41) {
        while (number >= 32 && number <= 41)
            number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
    }
    return number;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] numberUsed;
    numberUsed = new int[40];
    for (int i = 0; i < 40; ++i) {
        numberUsed[i] = 0;
    }
    int previousNumber = 0;
    for (int y = 0; y < 40; ++y) {
        int number = 1;
        while (numberUsed[ number = GenerateNumber
                         (previousNumber, numberUsed) ] != 0);
        numberUsed[number] = 1;
        previousNumber = number;
        System.out.println(y);
    }
}
}

EDIT: Okay, so now, for some reason, the for loop (the one with y as a counter) is not running 40 times when I include the while loop. Can someone explain why this is happening?

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15  
Worst. Question title. Ever. :) –  Alexis Pigeon May 18 '12 at 19:04
    
@AlexisPigeon: Yeah, I was thrown off too! –  Makoto May 18 '12 at 19:05
    
Hehe. I was in a rush, and I didn't think that part through. Anyhow, can someone please help? –  user1004192 May 18 '12 at 19:07
2  
Cool down first and get a fresh coffee, good code was never written in a hurry :) –  Thomas Jungblut May 18 '12 at 19:07
2  
Could you post the actual assignment, the code I posted would work sometimes, but it could end up in a case where 1-39 had been output, and 39 was the previous number, so it will loop forever because there are no acceptable numbers left to output. –  Kevin DiTraglia May 18 '12 at 19:26

6 Answers 6

Your function will eventually have a problem to ever return to the main.

You will face a recursion problem in

if (numberUsed[number] != 0) {
    return GenerateNumber(previousNumber, numberUsed);
}

As the array get's filled up with 1s, this will continue to execute the function call instead of actually successfully returning. It will execute the function recursively, eventually causing the stack overflow.

When you call the function again, your parameters (previousNumber and numberUsed) are identical to the last execution, nothing changes. You keep running into the same problem since the chance of hitting a non-zero is so high, so the recursion just stacks up forever and eventually crashes.

You should get rid of the if statement in the function and just return the number back to main and do your checks there.

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1  
You need to rethink this a bit: the array starts as filled with zeroes (so no recursion in the beginning), then gets filled with 1s in main(), then the recursion starts (deeper and deeper as more and more of the array is filled with 1s) –  Attila May 18 '12 at 19:21

You start with a zero'd out array, that you gradually fill with 1s and never reset them to 0. When most of the elements of the array are non-zeros, you have a very high chance of calling GenerateNumber recursively in a very deep nesting, which is what you experience.

Also, you never change previousNumber in GenerateNumber, so you will always go down the same path, regardless of the random number generated.

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Seriously? I was hoping I would get lucky and that wouldn't happen :( So how do you think I should fix this? –  user1004192 May 18 '12 at 19:10
    
You could change your code to use a loop instead of recursion (it will still take along time to finish when the array is mostly filled with 1s) or keep a vector<> or set<> of yet unused numbers and select from those only –  Attila May 18 '12 at 19:18
    
Also, make sure your generated number is within the range of 0-39, so you access the entire range of the 40 element array in numbersUsed[number] –  Attila May 18 '12 at 19:24

After staring at this for a while, I think I figured out a working solution. It's still really ugly, but you seem to be OK with that.

public static int GenerateNumber(int previousNumber, 
                                int[] numberUsed) {
    Random random = new Random();
    int number = random.nextInt(39);
    while (numberUsed[number] != 0) {
        number = random.nextInt(39);
        if (previousNumber >= 1 && previousNumber <= 9) {
            while (number >= 1 && number <= 9)
                number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
        } else if (previousNumber >= 10 && previousNumber <= 17) {
            while (number >= 10 && previousNumber <= 17)
                number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
        } else if (previousNumber >= 18 && previousNumber <= 32) {
            while (number >= 18 && previousNumber <= 32)
                number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
        } else if (previousNumber >= 33 && previousNumber <= 41) {
            while (number >= 32 && number <= 41)
                    number = random.nextInt(39) + 1;
        }
    }
    return number;
}

On a side note the run-time will also be atrocious as you get towards the end of the list, but it shouldn't stack overflow. Also it might infinite loop now that I think about it, you probably need to redesign this entirely.

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It gets hung up in an infinite loop, a condition in which number doesn't advance properly. –  Makoto May 18 '12 at 19:18
    
Thanks, I edited my program to be like this and just noticed that you posted this :) Unfortunately, I'm not getting enough numbers to be outputted for some reason. –  user1004192 May 18 '12 at 19:23
    
In your code you are missing the number = random.nextInt(39); line within the while loop. –  Kevin DiTraglia May 18 '12 at 19:38

StackOverFlow happens because of overlapping of methods/constructors, etc. I here,

if (numberUsed[number] != 0) {
        return GenerateNumber(previousNumber, numberUsed);
    }

this code is inside the GenerateNumber method and it is keep on calling the same method. That's the reason. If you want to check it, remove that part and try, it will compile fine. To get rid of this, eliminate the above process.

You can do it by using a loop, while loop, and putting all of your if else statements inside that

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This code detects a cul-de-sac and keeps restarting until it reaches the end (typically it does only one or two retries). It also directly chooses a random number from the collected sequence of allowed choices, so no stochastic runtime for any single try.

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.BitSet;
import java.util.Random;

public class RandomNumberGenerator {
  static final Random random = new Random();
  static final BitSet usedNumbers = new BitSet(40);
  static final int[] ticks = {0, 1, 10, 18, 33, 41};
  static int previousNumber;

  public static int generateNumber() {
    for (int i = 1; i < ticks.length; i++)
      if (previousNumber < ticks[i])
        return generateOutsideRange(ticks[i-1], ticks[i]);
    return generateOutsideRange(0, 0);
  }

  static int generateOutsideRange(int low, int high) {
    final int[] numsToChoose = new int[40];
    int choiceLimit = 0;
    for (int i = (low > 1? 1 : high); i < 41; i = (++i == low? high : i))
      if (!usedNumbers.get(i)) numsToChoose[choiceLimit++] = i;
    if (choiceLimit == 0) throw new CulDeSacException();
    final int r = numsToChoose[random.nextInt(choiceLimit)];
    usedNumbers.set(r);
    previousNumber = r;
    return r;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    while (true) try {
      usedNumbers.clear();
      previousNumber = -1;
      final int[] rands = new int[40];
      for (int i = 0; i < rands.length; i++) rands[i] = generateNumber();
      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(rands));
      break;
    } catch (CulDeSacException e) { System.out.println("Retry"); }
  }
}

class CulDeSacException extends RuntimeException {}
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Better code, but still suffers from the same situation of an infinite loop if a number needs to be generated in a range that has no numbers left to generate –  Kevin DiTraglia May 18 '12 at 20:18
    
@KDiTraglia Fixed now. –  Marko Topolnik May 18 '12 at 21:07

Is this the spected behavior? "Shuffling the Array"

    ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    int[] scrambled = new int[40];
    Random rnd = new Random();
    for(int i=0;i<scrambled.length;i++){
        numbers.add(i+1);
    }
    int idx=0;
    while(!numbers.isEmpty()){
        int pos = rnd.nextInt(numbers.size());

        scrambled[idx] = numbers.get(pos);
        numbers.remove(pos);

        idx++;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<scrambled.length;i++){
        System.out.println(scrambled[i]);
    }
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