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in Excel, =ROUNDUP(474.872126666666, 2) -> 474.88
in .NET,

Math.Round(474.87212666666666666666666666667, 2, MidpointRounding.ToEven) // 474.87
Math.Round(474.87212666666666666666666666667, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) // 474.87

My client want Excel rounding result, is there any way I can get 474.88 in .NET?

Thanks a lot

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted
double ROUNDUP( double number, int digits )
  {
     return Math.Ceiling(number * Math.Pow(10, digits)) / Math.Pow(10, digits);
  }
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This solution will cover happy flows quite well. Unfortunately it will not work correctly for negative numbers, it will not work correctly for negative number of digits (which excel supports) and it will not work correctly when "number" approaches large values like Double.Max, because you're multiplying a very large value and it will go out of range. –  Liviu Trifoi Jan 29 '14 at 9:48

Math.Ceiling is what you're looking for.

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1  
Note that OP will need to multiply by 100 before performing Math.Ceiling and then divide by 100, since you can't specify # of decimal points with this function. –  Michael Bray Jun 30 '09 at 20:33
    
Math.Ceiling(474.87212666666666666666666666667) returns 475 which is not what I want. –  nandin Jun 30 '09 at 20:34
2  
Math.Ceiling(474.87212666666666666666666666667*100)/100 works. thank you both –  nandin Jun 30 '09 at 20:35

Here's my try on a solution that behaves like Excel ROUNDUP function. I tried to cover cases such as: negative decimal numbers, negative digits (yep Excel supports that), large decimal values

public static decimal RoundUp(decimal number, int digits)
{
    if (digits > 0) 
    {
        // numbers will have a format like +/-1.23, where the fractional part is optional if numbers are integral
        // Excel RoundUp rounds negative numbers as if they were positive. 
        // To simulate this behavior we will use the absolute value of the number
        // E.g. |1.23| = |-1.23| = 1.23
        var absNumber = Math.Abs(number);

        // Now take the integral part (E.g. for 1.23 is 1)
        var absNumberIntegralPart = Decimal.Floor(absNumber);

        // Now take the fractional part (E.g. for 1.23 is 0.23)
        var fraction = (absNumber - absNumberIntegralPart);

        // Multiply fractional part by the 10 ^ number of digits we're rounding to
        // E.g. For 1.23 with rounded to 1 digit it will be 0.23 * 10^1 = 2.3
        // Then we round that value UP using Decimal.Ceiling and we transform it back to a fractional part by dividing it by 10^number of digits
        // E.g. Decimal.Ceiling(0.23 * 10) / 10 = Decimal.Ceiling(2.3) / 10 = 3 / 10 = 0.3
        var tenPower = (decimal)Math.Pow(10, digits);
        var fractionRoundedUp = Decimal.Ceiling(fraction * tenPower) / tenPower;

        // Now we add up the absolute part with the rounded up fractional part and we put back the negative sign if needed
        // E.g. 1 + 0.3 = 1.3
        return Math.Sign(number) * (absNumberIntegralPart + fractionRoundedUp);
    } else if (digits == 0)
    {
        return Math.Sign(number) * Decimal.Ceiling(Math.Abs(number));
    } else if (digits < 0) 
    {
        // negative digit rounding means that for RoundUp(149.12, -2) we will discard the fractional part, shift the decimal point on the left part 2 places before rounding up
        // then replace all digits on the right of the decimal point with zeroes
        // E.g. RoundUp(149.12, -2). Shift decimal point 2 places => 1.49. Now roundup(1.49) = 2 and we put 00 instead of 49 => 200

        var absNumber = Math.Abs(number);
        var absNumberIntegralPart = Decimal.Floor(absNumber);
        var tenPower = (decimal)Math.Pow(10, -digits);
        var absNumberIntegraPartRoundedUp = Decimal.Ceiling(absNumberIntegralPart / tenPower) * tenPower;
        return Math.Sign(number)*absNumberIntegraPartRoundedUp;
    }

    return number;
}

        [TestMethod]
        public void Can_RoundUp_Correctly()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(1.466m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(1.4655m, 3));
            Assert.AreEqual(-1.466m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(-1.4655m, 3));
            Assert.AreEqual(150m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(149.001m, 0));
            Assert.AreEqual(-150m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(-149.001m, 0));
            Assert.AreEqual(149.2m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(149.12m, 1));
            Assert.AreEqual(149.12m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(149.12m, 2));
            Assert.AreEqual(1232m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(1232, 2));
            Assert.AreEqual(200m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(149.123m, -2));
            Assert.AreEqual(-200m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(-149.123m, -2));
            Assert.AreEqual(-20m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(-12.4655m, -1));
            Assert.AreEqual(1.67m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(1.666666666666666666666666666m, 2));
            Assert.AreEqual(1000000000000000000000000000m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(999999999999999999999999999m, -2));
            Assert.AreEqual(10000000000000m, MathExtensions.RoundUp(9999999999999.999m, 2));
        }
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