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I'd like to calculate the pdf for the Dirichlet distribution in python, but haven't been able to find code to do so in any kind of standard library. scipy.stats includes a long list of distributions but doesn't seem to include the Dirichlet, and numpy.random.mtrand lets one sample from it, but doesn't give the pdf.

Since the Dirichlet is pretty common, I'm wondering whether there's some other name I should be searching for it by in scipy.stats or similar, or whether I've just missed it somehow.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

I couldn't find one in numpy, but it looked enough to implement. Here's an ugly little one-liner. (I followed the function given on Wikipedia, except you have to provide x = [x1, ..., xk] and alpha = [a1, ..., ak]).

import math
import operator

def dirichlet_pdf(x, alpha):
  return (math.gamma(sum(alpha)) / 
          reduce(operator.mul, [math.gamma(a) for a in alpha]) *
          reduce(operator.mul, [x[i]**(alpha[i]-1.0) for i in range(len(alpha))]))

Warning: I haven't tested this. Let me know if it works.

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Thanks for this. I was planning to write something similar if nobody pointed to one already existing somewhere. – jpmccoy May 21 '12 at 2:35
    
For those seeing this post in 2016+, use the scipy.stats solution below! It's now added. – Dylan Daniels Jan 7 at 4:38

As of scipy version 0.15, you can use scipy.stats.dirichlet.pdf (see here)

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You can derive the Dirichlet distribution from the gamma distribution. This is shown on the wikipedia page. There you find this python code:

    params = [a1, a2, ..., ak]
    sample = [random.gammavariate(a,1) for a in params]
    sample = [v/sum(sample) for v in sample]
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That's for sampling from the Dirichlet. I want the pdf. The formula for the pdf is reasonably straightforward and I could just implement it, but if the Dirichlet is hiding somewhere in scipy or similar it'd be useful. – jpmccoy May 18 '12 at 20:30

I think that it might be included at numpy.random.mtrand.dirichlet but I'm not completely sure if that is the pdf or for sampling.

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it's just for sampling – Ricky Robinson Jul 19 '12 at 12:09

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