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In work today, I came across the volatile keyword in Java. Not being very familiar with it, I found this explaination: Java theory and practice: Managing volatility

Given the detail in which that article explains the keyword in question, do you ever use it or could you ever see a case in which you could use this keyword in the correct manner?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 238 down vote accepted

volatile has semantics for memory visibility. Basically, the value of a volatile field becomes visible to all readers (other threads in particular) after a write operation completes on it. Without volatile, readers could see some non-updated value.

To answer your question: Yes, I use a volatile variable to control whether some code continues a loop. The loop tests the volatile value and continues if it is true. The condition can be set to false by calling a "stop" method. The loop sees false and terminates when it tests the value after the stop method completes execution.

The book "Java Concurrency in Practice," which I highly recommend, gives a good explanation of volatile. This book is written by the same person who wrote the IBM article that is referenced in the question (in fact, he cites his book at the bottom of that article). My use of volatile is what his article calls the "pattern 1 status flag."

If you want to learn more about how volatile works under the hood, read up on the Java memory model. If you want to go beyond that level, check out a good computer architecture book like Hennessy & Patterson and read about cache coherence and cache consistency.

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3  
I concur - I've used volatile for the exact same reason - tracking when to end a loop in a multi-threaded application. –  Darren Greaves Jun 3 '09 at 10:13
14  
This answer is correct, but incomplete. It omits an important property of volatile that came with the new Java Memory Model defined in JSR 133: that when a thread reads a volatile variable it sees not only the value last written to it by some other thread, but also all other writes to other variables that were visible in that other thread at the time of the volatile write. See this answer and this reference. –  Adam Zalcman Jul 18 '13 at 12:32
1  
For beginners, I'd request you to demonstrate with some code (please?) –  ambigram_maker Feb 22 at 6:43
    
The article linked in the question has code examples. –  Greg Mattes Feb 22 at 23:37

“… the volatile modifier guarantees that any thread that reads a field will see the most recently written value.” - Josh Bloch

If you are thinking about using volatile, read up on the package java.util.concurrent which deals with atomic behaviour.

The Wikipedia post on a Singleton Pattern shows volatile in use.

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The quote really brings it to the point. –  Zarathustra Mar 28 at 8:19

One common example for using volatile is to use a volatile boolean variable as a flag to terminate a thread. If you've started a thread, and you want to be able to safely interrupt it from a different thread, you can have the thread periodically check a flag. To stop it, set the flag to true. By making the flag volatile, you can ensure that the thread that is checking it will see it has been set the next time it checks it without having to even use a synchronized block.

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volatile is very useful to stop threads.

Not that you should be writing your own threads, Java 1.6 has a lot of nice thread pools. But if you are sure you need a thread, you'll need to know how to stop it.

The pattern I use for threads is:

public class Foo extends Thread {
  private volatile boolean close = false;
  public void run() {
    while(!close) {
      // do work
    }
  }
  public void close() {
    close = true;
    // interrupt here if needed
  }
}

Notice how there's no need for synchronization

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I wonder why that is even necessary. Isn't that only necessary if other threads have to react on the status change of this thread in such a way that the threads synchronization is at danger? –  Jori Jun 6 '13 at 7:27
4  
@Jori, you need volatile because the thread reading close in the while loop is different from the one that calls close(). Without volatile, the thread running the loop may never see the change to close. –  Pyrolistical Jun 6 '13 at 18:48

Yes, volatile must be used whenever you want a mutable variable to be accessed by multiple threads. It is not very common usecase because typically you need to perform more than a single atomic operation (e.g. check the variable state before modifying it), in which case you would use a synchronized block instead.

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One common example for using volatile is to use a volatile boolean variable as a flag to terminate a thread. If you've started a thread, and you want to be able to safely interrupt it from a different thread, you can have the thread periodically check a flag. To stop it, set the flag to true. By making the flag volatile, you can ensure that the thread that is checking it will see it has been set the next time it checks it without having to even use a synchronized block.

"interrupt from a different thread", then how would you answer, why you need 'volatile' field to hold the cancellation state when the same thread starts the thread and invokes cancel?

package net.jcip.examples;

import static java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit.SECONDS;
import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

import net.jcip.annotations.*;

/**
 * PrimeGenerator
 * <p/>
 * Using a volatile field to hold cancellation state
 *
 * @author Brian Goetz and Tim Peierls
 */
@ThreadSafe
public class PrimeGenerator implements Runnable {
    private static ExecutorService exec = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    @GuardedBy("this") private final List<BigInteger> primes
            = new ArrayList<BigInteger>();
    private volatile boolean cancelled;

    public void run() {
        BigInteger p = BigInteger.ONE;
        while (!cancelled) {
            p = p.nextProbablePrime();
            synchronized (this) {
                primes.add(p);
            }
        }
    }

    public void cancel() {
        cancelled = true;
    }

    public synchronized List<BigInteger> get() {
        return new ArrayList<BigInteger>(primes);
    }

    static List<BigInteger> aSecondOfPrimes() throws InterruptedException {
        PrimeGenerator generator = new PrimeGenerator();
        exec.execute(generator);
        try {
            SECONDS.sleep(1);
        } finally {
            generator.cancel();
        }
        return generator.get();
    }
}
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volatile is only guarantees that all threads even themselves are incrementing for ex. a counter, sees the same face of the variable at the same time. It is not used instead of syncronized or atomic or other staff, it completely makes the reads syncronized. Please do not compare it with other java keywords. As example shows below. Volatile variable operations are also atomic they fail or suceeds aat once.

package io.netty.example.telnet;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Main {

    public static volatile  int a = 0;
    public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException{

        List<Thread> list = new  ArrayList<Thread>();
        for(int i = 0 ; i<11 ;i++){
            list.add(new Pojo());
        }

        for (Thread thread : list) {
            thread.start();
        }

        Thread.sleep(20000);
        System.out.println(a);
    }
}
class Pojo extends Thread{
    int a = 10001;
    public void run() {
        while(a-->0){
            try {
                Thread.sleep(1);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            Main.a++;
            System.out.println("a = "+Main.a);
        }
    }
}

Even you put volatile or not results will always differ. But if you use AtomicInteger as below results will be always same. This is same with synronized also.

    package io.netty.example.telnet;

    import java.util.ArrayList;
    import java.util.List;
    import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

    public class Main {

        public static volatile  AtomicInteger a = new AtomicInteger(0);
        public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException{

            List<Thread> list = new  ArrayList<Thread>();
            for(int i = 0 ; i<11 ;i++){
                list.add(new Pojo());
            }

            for (Thread thread : list) {
                thread.start();
            }

            Thread.sleep(20000);
            System.out.println(a.get());

        }
    }
    class Pojo extends Thread{
        int a = 10001;
        public void run() {
            while(a-->0){
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
                Main.a.incrementAndGet();
                System.out.println("a = "+Main.a);
            }
        }
    }
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Yes, I use it quite a lot - it can be very useful for multi-threaded code. The article you pointed to is a good one. Though there are two important things to bear in mind:

  1. You should only use volatile if you completely understand what it does and how it differs to synchronized. In many situations volatile appears, on the surface, to be a simpler more performant alternative to synchronized, when often a better understanding of volatile would make clear that synchronized is the only option that would work.
  2. volatile doesn't actually work in a lot of older JVMs, although synchronized does. I remember seeing a document that referenced the various levels of support in different JVMs but unfortunately I can't find it now. Definitely look into it if you're using Java pre 1.5 or if you don't have control over the JVMs that your program will be running on.
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Absolutely, yes. (And not just in Java, but also in C#.) There are times when you need to get or set a value that is guaranteed to be an atomic operation on your given platform, an int or boolean, for example, but do not require the overhead of thread locking. The volatile keyword allows you to ensure that when you read the value that you get the current value and not a cached value that was just made obsolete by a write on another thread.

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Corrected. Thanks! –  dgvid Jan 6 '12 at 14:29

You'll need to use 'volatile' keyword, or 'synchronized' and any other concurrency control tools and techniques you might have at your disposal if you are developing a multithreaded application. Example of such application is desktop apps.

If you are developing an application that would be deployed to application server (Tomcat, JBoss AS, Glassfish, etc) you don't have to handle concurrency control yourself as it already addressed by the application server. In fact, if I remembered correctly the Java EE standard prohibit any concurrency control in servlets and EJBs, since it is part of the 'infrastructure' layer which you supposed to be freed from handling it. You only do concurrency control in such app if you're implementing singleton objects. This even already addressed if you knit your components using frameworkd like Spring.

So, in most cases of Java development where the application is a web application and using IoC framework like Spring or EJB, you wouldn't need to use 'volatile'.

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IMO two important scenarios other than stopping thread in which volatile keyword is used are

  1. Double-checked locking mechanism. Used often in Singleton design pattern. In this the singleton object needs to be declared volatile.
  2. Spurious Wakeups. Thread may sometimes wake up from wait call even if no notify call has been issued. This behavior is called supurious wakeup. This can be countered by using a conditional variable(boolean flag). Put the wait() call in a while loop as long as the flag is true. So if thread wakes up from wait call due to any reasons other than notify/notifyall then it encounters flag is still true and hence calls wait again. Prior to calling notify set this flag to true. In this case the boolean flag is declared as volatile.
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Every thread accessing a volatile field will read its current value before continuing, instead of (potentially) using a cached value.

Only member variable can be volatile or transient.

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