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I want to iterate through a list that contains a mix of lists and non-list elements. Here's an example:

a = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 8, 9, 0, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]] 

I know how to iterate through a mandatory list of lists, but in this case I don't know how to do it. My objective is to compare one value of the nested list with another value in the list. For example in this case: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] and 8

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4  
Please give an example of what you want with both input and output. –  robert May 18 '12 at 20:19
    
@robert i want to compare one value outside the inner list, with the numbers within the inner list, and if they are equal, delete the value in the inner list –  Andfoy May 18 '12 at 20:22
2  
I'm still not sure exactly what you want. Please show an example. –  robert May 18 '12 at 20:23
    
@Andfoy check out my solution. –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 18 '12 at 21:05
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this what you want:

thelist = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, [9, 0, 1, 8]]
# Remove the 5 from the first inner list because it was found outside.
# Remove the 8 from the other inner list, because it was found outside.
expected_output =[[1, 2, 3, 4], 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, [9, 0, 1]]

Here's a way to do it:

thelist = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 5, 6, 7, 8, [9, 0, 1, 8]]

expected_output =[[1, 2, 3, 4], 5, 6, 7, 8, [9, 0, 1]]

removal_items = []

for item in thelist:
    if not isinstance(item, list):
        removal_items.append(item)

for item in thelist:
    if isinstance(item, list):
        for remove in removal_items:
            if remove in item:
                item.remove(remove)

print thelist

assert thelist == expected_output
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Yes, that's exactly what i want, but so far i have separated the lists from the inner values, is there any method to do this??? –  Andfoy May 18 '12 at 20:34
    
Nothing built in. –  jgritty May 18 '12 at 20:34
    
So i must separate the lists and the outside values, compare, delete and create again the list? –  Andfoy May 18 '12 at 20:35
1  
@Andfoy, you can use filter(lambda elem: type(elem) is not list, a), which is a built-in function that will remove any list element from your main list. As for create again the list, you don't have to. The code from @jgritty modifies your original list directly. –  Rodrigue May 18 '12 at 21:11
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A slightly different version than the answer from jgritty. The differences:

  • we use the filter() built-in to extract the int elements from your list
  • we keep the integers in a set instead of a list
  • we iterate over a copy of a, so that we can safely remove elements from a itself at the same time
  • use list comprehension to remove members of nested lists that are already in the main list

    a = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 5, 6, 7, 8, [9, 0, 1, 8]]
    print a
    
    numbers = set(filter(lambda elem: type(elem) is not list, a))
    
    for elem in a:
        if type(elem) is list:
            elem[:] = [number for number in elem if number not in numbers]
    
    print a
    
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1  
Is there a reason you do for elem in a[:]: instead of for elem in a:? –  jgritty May 18 '12 at 21:18
1  
Good question. a[:] is an idiomatic way of getting a copy of a list in Python. It is not a good idea to modify a list while iterating over it, as explained in the online doc –  Rodrigue May 18 '12 at 21:25
1  
It's really only the elem list that needs to be copied I think. It doesn't seem that you're modifying a, only its elements. Also, I don't iterate over the inner lists for exactly that reason. –  jgritty May 18 '12 at 21:33
1  
@jgritty good point, there is indeed no need to get a copy of the outer list. I modified my example accordingly. Also, agreed that your version works. –  Rodrigue May 18 '12 at 21:45
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a = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 8, 9, 0, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]]
for x in a:
    if type(x) is list:
        for y in x:
            print y
    else:
        print x

or use

isinstance(x, list)
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3  
isinstance is usually preferable than type –  San4ez May 18 '12 at 20:28
    
Definitely use isinstance, have that as the only way and remove your check of type. –  jamylak May 19 '12 at 6:03
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You can check if the object of the iteration is a ListType (http://docs.python.org/library/types.html) and iterate it further.

I cant remember now the exact command but there is something like type(x) that you can use to get the object's type.

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