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I have a two optional parameters empName, empLoc. Both of these parameters can be null, empty or have some value. If both has values, i will have to get all the values, if empName has value then i only need to get value where empName is equal to passed parameter @empName, and same with @empLoc. I know i can write separate sql's in same stored procedure but i want to do it using CASE clause, since it is going to save most of the repeated code. However i am having problem while setting up query. And i know it's the CASE clause. Here is what my query looks like:

SELECT 
     EmpID,
     EmpDept
FROM Employee
WHERE TimeStamp = @timeStamp
 **AND (CASE
        WHEN DATALENGTH(@empName) > 0 THEN EmployeeName LIKE '%' +@empName+'%'
      ELSE
         EmployeeLocation LIKE '%' +@empLoc+'%'
      END)**

NOTE: im already doing null check for these parameters. Also this query will only run if either @empName or @empLoc has some value.

Any suggestions how to fix this?

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1  
You didn't say what your problem is... –  ilanco May 18 '12 at 20:29
    
Why are you even using LIKE? Shouldn't this information be stored somewhere? –  swasheck May 18 '12 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually you must put the DATALENGTH(@empName) <= 0 on the second part of the OR because the CASE implies an exclusive OR. So the correct one would be:

SELECT 
     EmpID,
     EmpDept
FROM Employee
WHERE TimeStamp = @timeStamp
AND 
(
    (DATALENGTH(@empName) > 0 AND EmployeeName LIKE '%' +@empName+'%')
      OR
    (DATALENGTH(@empName) <= 0 AND EmployeeLocation LIKE '%' +@empLoc+'%')
)
share|improve this answer
    
I like this pattern which is commonly referred to as "Catch All Queries". Be sure to add an OPTION (RECOMPILE) to the end of the statement so that the query optimizer can do it's job better and possibly avoid (very) bad performing queries. More info: sqlinthewild.co.za/index.php/2009/03/19/catch-all-queries –  buckley May 18 '12 at 20:55

CASE is an expression that returns a value:

where TimeStamp = @timeStamp and
  CASE WHEN DATALENGTH(@empName) > 0 AND EmployeeName LIKE '%' +@empName+'%' THEN 1
    WHEN EmployeeLocation LIKE '%' +@empLoc+'%' THEN 1
    ELSE 0
    END = 1
share|improve this answer
    
This will result in a scan. It's Better to use the pattern suggested by Tiago. –  buckley May 18 '12 at 21:09
    
@buckley - Both this approach and Tiago's will use an index on TimeStamp, if any. Any LIKE pattern that starts with a percent sign will require a scan. What am I missing? –  HABO May 19 '12 at 0:49
    
A like pattern that starts with a % can still benefit from a non clustered index on the column because it will result in a scan of fewer data (I tested this just now). With the scan above I meant a plain scan (table scan in case of a heap or clustered index scan) which the optimizer is forced to do if you give it a CASE in the where. Tiago converted the where clause to a SARG which gives the optimizer more options (even though the optimizer could decide not to use an index at that point in time). –  buckley May 19 '12 at 22:37
    
One should always strive to create queries with sargs as you probably know. This allows the dba to create indices when certain queries get too slow without altering code = chance of introducing bugs. Don't you agree to avoid the CASE or do you see advantages to it? –  buckley May 19 '12 at 22:38
    
@buckley - I understand the SARGability issue. In my defense, I was trying to address the OP's question re CASE syntax without going to far afield. Your remark about using an index with LIKE still has me puzzled. I've found information about how the optimizer uses selectivity statistics to determine how to process a LIKE, but nothing that indicates a "like pattern that starts with a % can still benefit from a non clustered index ...". Could you point me to a resource that explains it? SO keeps teaching me how little I know. That should be their Sales Mark. –  HABO May 21 '12 at 13:29

You can use LEN function if you want to trim space

SELECT DATALENGTH(' ') --Result is 1
SELECT LEN(' ') -- Result is 0
share|improve this answer

you don't need to case when statement for this problem

SELECT 
     EmpID,
     EmpDept
FROM Employee
WHERE TimeStamp = @timeStamp
 AND
    ( ( DATALENGTH(@empName) > 0 AND EmployeeName LIKE '%' +@empName+'%')
      OR
      ( DATALENGTH(@empName) = 0 AND  EmployeeLocation LIKE '%' +@empLoc+'%'))
share|improve this answer
    
DATALENGTH(@empName) = 0 should be DATALENGTH(@empName) <= 0 –  buckley May 18 '12 at 20:52
    
DATALENGTH will never return negative. so "=" is enough. Can you write a text have negative length? –  Tufan Barış Yıldırım May 18 '12 at 20:53
    
That's an assumption you I presume since It isn't in the documentation at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173486.aspx Note that I agree that it is unlikely but what if this function returns negative numbers to signal exceptions? It seems better to keep them logically equivalent. –  buckley May 18 '12 at 20:58

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