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I'm trying to write code that returns the depth of the deepest leaf in a tree with arbitrary number of children per nodes, in Python, using DFS rather than BFS. It seeems I'm close, but the following code still has some bug that I can't figure out (i.e. the returned depth is not correct). Any help?

A test tree would be simply: [[1,2,3],[4,5],[6],[7],[8],[],[],[],[]]

def max_depth_dfs(tree): # DOESN'T WORK

    max_depth, curr_depth, Q = 0,0, [0]
    visited = set()

    while Q != []:
        n = Q[0]
        more = [v for v in tree[n] if v not in visited]
        if not more:
            visited.add(n)
            curr_depth -= 1
            Q = Q[1:]
        else:
            curr_depth += 1

        max_depth = max(max_depth, curr_depth)
        Q = more + Q

    return max_depth
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Just to make sure the issue is in the code and the interpretation of the requirement: What would you expect the depth to be in your example tree of [[1,2,3],[4,5],[6],[7],[8],[],[],[],[]]? And what is the code returning? –  pamphlet May 18 '12 at 20:44
    
Yes, good point. I'm expecting the depth of node 0 to be 0, and the depth of that specific tree to be 3. The depth of [[1],[]] should be 1, the depth of [[1],[2],[]] should be 2 and so on. –  Frank May 18 '12 at 20:45
1  
For that input, this does return 3 Repl.it proof –  Paul Phillips May 18 '12 at 20:47
    
You are right, but it's a lucky case. [[1,2,3],[4,5],[6],[7],[],[],[8],[],[]] gives 2, and it should be 3. I was tracing "curr_depth" on the first example, and although it gives 3, curr_depth was out of whack. –  Frank May 18 '12 at 20:49
    
I'm a bit confused by the tree structure. Is it that an integer a leaf node with a data value, and an array is a branch node? None of your examples show further nesting like [[1] [2 [3, 4]]]. Is that allowed? –  pamphlet May 18 '12 at 20:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found the bug!

if not more:
    visited.add(n)
    curr_depth -= 1
    Q = Q[1:]

When you visit the node 4, curr_depth is equal to 2. Node 4 has no children, so you decrease the curr_depth and curr_depth is equal to 1 now. However, the next node you will visit is node 5 and the depth of node 5 is 2 instead of 1. Therefore, curr_depth doesn't record the correct depth of the node in the tree.

The following solution may be helpful.

def max_depth_dfs(tree):

    max_depth, curr_depth, Q = 0, 0, [0]
    visited = set()

    while Q != []:
        n = Q[0]

        max_depth = max(max_depth, curr_depth)

        if n in visited:
            curr_depth -= 1
            Q = Q[1:]
            continue

        #print n, curr_depth     #show the node and its depth in the tree

        visited.add(n)
        more = [v for v in tree[n]]
        if not more:
            Q = Q[1:]
        else:
            curr_depth += 1
            Q = more + Q

    return max_depth
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Very nice!!! It passes all my unit tests so far. Thanks a lot! –  Frank May 19 '12 at 14:18
    
One thing I realized is that keeping the "visited" data structure means that we are "copying" the tree to that data structure. That is, at the end of the execution, all the nodes are stored once in "tree" and once in "visited"... Is it possible to do better? –  Frank May 19 '12 at 14:22
    
You can just record the index of the node which is visited, instead of copying the node to "visited" data structure. –  Adonis Ling May 19 '12 at 15:52
    
Yes, not copy the whole node itself. I was thinking more about not having the "visited" data structure at all, neither for whole nodes, nor for references to nodes. –  Frank May 19 '12 at 16:54
    
Recursive version can do that, but I don't think it's a good idea. –  Adonis Ling May 19 '12 at 17:14

I used try .. catch to distinguish branches from leafs. update No more exceptions :)

from collections import Iterable
tree = [[1,2,3],[4,5, [1, 6]],[6],[7],[8],[],[],[],[]]

def max_depth(tree, level=0):
  if isinstance(tree, Iterable):
    return max([ max_depth(item, level+1) for item in tree])
  else: # leaf
    return level

print max_depth(tree)
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I specifically do not want this recursive version because of stack limitations. I want to use my own stack (Q). I had the recursive version as: def max_depth(tree): def _depth(node): return 0 if tree[node] == [] else 1 + max(_depth(v) for v in tree[node]) return _depth(0) –  Frank May 18 '12 at 20:53
    
I would also suggest against an except clause with no exception set to catch as that would make it impossible to interrupt the execution of your function in almost any way –  Toote May 18 '12 at 22:42

Here is the non-recurison version:

from collections import Iterable

def max_depth_no_recur(tree):
  max_depth, node =  0, iter(tree)
  stack = [node]
  while stack:
    try:
      n = node.next()
    except StopIteration:
      if len(stack) > max_depth:
        max_depth = len(stack)
      node = stack.pop()
      continue

    if isinstance(n, Iterable):
        stack.append(node)
        node = iter(n)
  return max_depth
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This is very nice, but a lot of machinery. I was hoping for something simpler :-) (i.e. without Iterable, and without isinstance?) –  Frank May 18 '12 at 22:05
    
The previous version didn't worked. This one does. Iterable is just to identify if node can be dug dipper. –  Aleš Kotnik May 18 '12 at 22:19
    
Yes, that's why I was leaving the node id on the stack till all its children had been explored: I do Q = Q[1:] only when there is nothing to explore at that node anymore. –  Frank May 18 '12 at 22:21
    
This version is very memory efficient. It holds lazy iterators on the local stack only and does deep-first walk. –  Aleš Kotnik May 18 '12 at 22:25
    
Yes, the iterators are very efficient. –  Frank May 18 '12 at 22:26

After taking into account all the good feedback I got from Alex and Adonis and refining the code, I currently have the current version:

def max_depth_dfs(tree): # correct

max_depth, curr_depth, Q = 0, 0, [0]
visited = set()

while Q != []:

    n = Q[0]

    if n in visited:
        Q = Q[1:]
        curr_depth -= 1
        visited.remove(n) # won't go back, save memory 
        print 'backtrack from', n        
        continue

    # proper place to print depth in sync with node id
    print 'visiting', n, 'children=', tree[n], 'curr_depth=', curr_depth, 'Q=', Q,
    print visited # only current path, instead of visited part of tree

    if tree[n]:
        visited.add(n) # if leaf, won't ever try to revisit
        Q = tree[n] + Q
        curr_depth += 1
        max_depth = max(max_depth, curr_depth) # no need to check if depth decreases
    else:
        Q = Q[1:] # leaf: won't revisit, will go to peer, if any, so don't change depth
        print 'no children for', n

return max_depth
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