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I am facing another TCP Socket issue. I've read through a huge bunch of questions an answers to similar issues, but my problem is somehow different.

I have a Java Client and C++ Server. Everything goes as expected until I'm using different machines (equal to other issues so far) The messages from the client seem to getting stuck in den TCP Buffer. When I finally close the socket, everything is sent to the server. But these single messages are controlmessages so I need them to be send immediatly. As far as I read this is expected behavior, but how do I send reliable control messages.

Is there a way to force the messages to be sent. (I can leave the socket open for a couple of minutes with nothing is sent.)

Is there something wrong? (see the following code)

Do I have to close the socket each time to perform a REAL flush?

Should I use UDP instead, with an additional amount of protocol work?

Javacode:

mSocketSend = new Socket();
mSocketSend.connect(new InetSocketAddress(mServerIp, mSocketPortSend), mTimeOut);
PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(mSocketSend.getOutputStream(), true);
pw.println(data);

C++ Code:

   opening socket...(i leave that)
   char* buffer = new char[1024];
   int rc = recv(mConnectedSocket, buf, 1024, 0);

If you want more of it. Write it. I left almost everything out. ^^ I dont think its relevant. The Communication wents great usually.. No errors at all. So its just this TCPBuffer thingi.

I know there should be some delimiter or message length stuff. But in fact: A message length, which is not sent, does not help. ^^

Thanks for your help.

EDIT #01 The whole bunch of code:

mSocket->createSocketServer(22);
    char* buffer = new char[1024];
 while(true){

        int numberBytes = mSocket->receiveChars(buffer, 1024);

        if (numberBytes > 0){
            uninterestingHandlingFunction(buffer);
        }else{
            mSocket->createSocketServer(22);
        }
    }

bool Socket::createSocketServer(u_short port)
{
    if (mConnectedSocket != INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        closesocket(mConnectedSocket);
    }

    if (s == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        WSADATA wsa;

        if (WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,0), &wsa) != 0)
            return 0;

        s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
        if (s == INVALID_SOCKET)
            return 0;

        SOCKADDR_IN addr;
        memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN));
        addr.sin_family=AF_INET;
        addr.sin_port=htons(port);
        addr.sin_addr.s_addr=ADDR_ANY;

        if (bind(s, (SOCKADDR*)&addr, sizeof(SOCKADDR_IN)) == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            s = INVALID_SOCKET;
        } else if (listen(s, 10) == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            s = INVALID_SOCKET;
        }

        if (s == INVALID_SOCKET)
        {
            closesocket(s);
            return 0;
        }
    }
    mConnectedSocket = accept(s, NULL, NULL);

    if (mConnectedSocket == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        closesocket(s);
        return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int Socket::receiveChars(char* buf, unsigned maxSize)
{
    if (mConnectedSocket == INVALID_SOCKET)
        return -1;

    int rc = recv(mConnectedSocket, buf, maxSize, 0);
    if (rc == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        std::cout << "Socket: error " << WSAGetLastError() << std::endl;
    }
    return rc;
}

You wanted it....

EDIT #2 Give it one more try

There are few more things I tried out. At first: This problem does not occure on a device connected over real network everytime. -> Full Reboot Client&Server -> Problem does not occure -> Full Reboot Client&Server -> Problem occures

Sadly, I don't know what to take from this habit.

Another thing I stumbled over is the bind and listen socket (in Code SOCKET s). This socket listens for connections and if the working thread needs a new connection (on startup or if the previous closes) the socket s gives the next queued connection to mConnectedSocket for recv, other connections are backlogged while one is processed. From the Java view: a Socket is connected (Device A). next socket (Device B) tries to connect. -> Connection success (its properly controlled in code if this is happens indeed) -> followed by sending data in natural matter. (The socket is still in the backlog on c++ side)

Well, this is hard to transform to the habit I experienced. I'll try to express my thoughts. Javaside: PrintWriter is created. Feeded with data and is flushed. Because the connection is not fully established (No additional connectedSocket on C++ side). The flush doesn't work. And onClose the socket finally flushes its content.

Please tell me to shut up, if you think so. I dont really know what the "Connection is backlogged" ACTUALLY mean in implementation" ^^

I know, I should open a new thread for each connection, but I can't at the moment. So stick with this server code.

share|improve this question
    
Same problem I had faced. –  Bhavik Ambani May 18 '12 at 20:37
1  
Have you tried pw.flush() ? –  Mattias May 18 '12 at 20:37
    
PrintWriter(OutputStream, boolean autoflush) should do the work on '\n', but yes.. I tried that, too –  xeed May 18 '12 at 20:44
    
buf = buffer? The server waits for 1024 bytes or a eof? –  esej May 18 '12 at 20:48
    
Oh damn. yeah copied that together. The buffer is allocated somewhere else and it is passed as buf to the receiveFunc. The second question is something i dont really know. My current expectation is that recv return when atleast one byte can be received. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 20:55

7 Answers 7

You need to do a flush(), that pushes the data out.

share|improve this answer
    
PrintWriter(OutputStream, boolean autoflush) should do the work on '\n', but yes.. I tried that, too. Also mSocketSend.getOutputStream().flush() does'nt do the work. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 20:46
1  
Run wireshark to see what's happening on the wire then. –  Francis Upton May 18 '12 at 20:48
    
Yeah thought about that too. No Adminrights to install WinPCap... So I took the work home, but MAGICALLY the Problem does not occure here. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 20:50
    
See my new answer about making your recv in a loop. –  Francis Upton May 18 '12 at 20:55
    
try using getOutputStream directly? Try using select on C end? –  Arkadiy May 18 '12 at 20:56
PrintWriter.flush();

Or use a writer with automatic flushing.

You should also make sure that the server reads a line (until \n) and not the full 1024 chars, but I don't know what recv() does so I don't know about that.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: recv() will block until the file closes or the requested amount is read (barring other options which cause it to return early). –  Dave S May 18 '12 at 20:56
1  
Actually recv() will block until it gets some data, but it may not read all of it. –  Francis Upton May 18 '12 at 21:02
    
It does not... recv() return, when there is sth. it could possibly return. One Byte is enough. Keep in mind: This programm works, but not every time ^^ –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:10
PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(mSocketSend.getOutputStream(), true);
pw.println(data);
pw.flush();
share|improve this answer

Actually your problem could be on the receiving end, your recv needs to be in a loop (you can google for examples of this). There is no guarantee not much each call to recv will get. If you know you are flushing the data on the Java site, that's probably your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
It is in a loop. I edited my question to give you more insight into the code. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:12
    
What does your "uninterestingFunction" expect? Typically the recv loop will be done inside of your method that does the recv so that it gets all of the data available before blocking, rather than having your "application" function deal with partial data. –  Francis Upton May 18 '12 at 21:14
    
yes you are right. I m trying to convince my lead from this issue since a few weeks (Delimiter/Messagelength). But they say "No, this had worked, so it should work on."... But they are right in fact. I print the data which is sent immediatly, but the uninterestingFunction is not called at all. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:21
    
The way the 'recv' works is very implementation specific which is why it's probably working in one environment and not in the other. Your Java stuff is likely fine. –  Francis Upton May 18 '12 at 21:24
    
To give you more insight: Its actually a Android Application. Connect to 10.0.2.2(localhost) -> works fine. Connect to 192.168.0.100(localhost via network) -> no data. So it is the same machine. same build. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:29

As you are using auto flush and even tried using an explicit flush():

Could be because you don't open the inputStream. Try and do a getInputStream() as well.

Otherwise, Have you tried:

  1. any diff you don't use connect but just give the parameters directly in the Socket constructor?

  2. setTcpNoDelayon the socket (shouldn't cause minutes of delay though!!)?

share|improve this answer
    
Hm... Okay that getInputStream() thing is interesting. Why should I do that. I dont really understand why this should help. Can you explain it to me (I had it in (working) earlier version by mistake) 1. The communication works almost everytime, so i dont think that this should make a difference. 2. I tried that, even though I dont think that this should be used. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:07
    
Shouldn't really for normal sockets/os/jvm/..., but for higher abstractions like HttpUrlConnections for example needs it (to create response/request objects for the http layer) so a long shot, but I've seen stranger things happen depending on the other end of the connection. Should really use wireshark for this. –  Mattias May 18 '12 at 21:15
    
I'll try that, when I get to the affected machines. This is the only difference from the older versions, which worked fine. –  xeed May 18 '12 at 21:27
    
Negative, getInputStream() doesn't change anything. –  xeed May 21 '12 at 11:09

Your loop is incorrectly coded. Every new recv() will overwrite the previous one. You should advance the offset parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
You are wrong, the handling Function takes the data before the next recv call... Anyways... please stick to the issue... recv does not return a single time, when the problem occures... You wont help me if you point out every litte detail. –  xeed May 19 '12 at 16:40
    
What is 'the handling Function'? And since when is trying to answer the question a 'little detail'? –  EJP May 20 '12 at 3:10
    
the 'uninterestingHandlingFunction(buffer)' is called after recv returns and it takes the buffer and processes him. (and this function is not called at all -> recv does not return) The answer you gave cant lead to the described problem. I thought its one of the "You should do it better this way."-Answers -> Not a solution. A bit overreacted, sorry for that. ^^ –  xeed May 20 '12 at 20:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Fixed it. Kind of embarassing... The backlog, i noticed in my edit was indeed the problem. If two at clients at a time connect to the server, the second is backlogged and his messages would be processed, when the first disconnects.

Additionally (here comes the clue)

As mentioned before its an android java client. There is another thread on java side to receive data from the C++ server. This socket connects on another port. BUT i set the ports and ip addresses to connect to in a settings activity and there was a bad port for the other socket as default value (same as for the issuesocket, wrong variable taken) So this socket connects first and the issuesocket connects into the backlog. This default value is only taken if I enter the settings to set another IPAddress (For example, when I connect to a remote host instead of localhost)

Incredible circumstances... i didnt even wrote the settings...

WIRESHARK would have fixed this.

share|improve this answer

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