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This is a general question about Object Orientation and specifically overloading functions in .NET (or any other framework or language). I am looking at an application that has a lot of duplicate code. For example, have a look at the following functions:

Public Function Test(ByVal Test1 As String)

//code that is specifically relevant to Test1 variable

End Function

Public Function Test (ByVal Test1 As String, ByVal Test2 As String)
    //code that is specifically relevant to Test1 variable
    //code that is specifically relevant to Test2 variable
End Function

I would of thought that best pratice would be to put: //code that is specifically relevant to Test1 variable in a separate function as it is common in both functions. Is this the case? I have always thought that duplicate code is a very bad idea.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is not better:

Public Function Test(ByVal Test1 As String) 
    //code that is specifically relevant to Test1 variable
End Function 

Public Function Test (ByVal Test1 As String, ByVal Test2 As String) 
    Test(Test1)
    //code that is specifically relevant to Test2 variable 
End Function 

Overloading ideally should be about adding aditional features to the original function but preserving it's original behaviour in case you use it somewhere else in your code.

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thanks for hitting the nail on the head. The key to your answer is: Test(Test1) i.e. the original code is reused +1. Thanks. –  w0051977 May 18 '12 at 21:02

Typically, I will do something like this, when possible:

Public Function Test(ByVal Test1 As String)
    Test(Test1, Nothing)
End Function

Public Function Test (ByVal Test1 As String, ByVal Test2 As String)
    ' code that is specifically relevant to Test1 variable
    If Test2 IsNot Nothing Then
        ' code that is specifically relevant to Test2 variable
    End If
End Function
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Thanks for answering. I agree with what your saying +1. I prefer Shiin Zu's answer as you pass 'Nothing' to your function. –  w0051977 May 18 '12 at 21:04
    
Thanks. Both ways are good suggestions, but it depends on the situation which way makes sense. I would say that more often than not, in real-life situations, the way Shiin Zu answered won't make sense because the second argument affects something in the middle of the logic which cannot be easily done afterward. In fact, probably the most often situation is that the first overload is not passing Nothing to the second argument, but rather, passing some default value. –  Steven Doggart May 18 '12 at 23:17

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