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Assume there is a code as such:

package com.ps.Sample;

public interface Sample
{
    public void Method1();
}

public abstract class AbstractSample implements Sample
{
    public void Method1()
    {
        System.out.println("Hello World");
    }
}

public class MySample extends AbstractSample
{

}

public class TestSample
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Sample my = new MySample();

        my.Method1();
    }

}

My question is: Is there any benefit to declaring the concrete class as

public class MySample extends AbstractSample implements Sample

instead of

public class MySample extends AbstractSample 
share|improve this question
    
Note: the abstract class implements the interface. – Andy Thomas May 18 '12 at 21:21
up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, there is not. It's redundant. AbstractSample is a Sample, and MySample is a AbstractSample. So MySample is a Sample.

The javadoc displays all the implemented interfaces anyway, whether you add the implements Sample or not.

share|improve this answer
1  
Try to explain it using Person class like, something like.. we don't need to say that Teacher is Walker because Teacher is Person and Person is alredy Walker. IMO using Sample to explain it could not show the redundancy at all. – porfiriopartida May 18 '12 at 21:22
2  
You just did it :-) I used the same class names as the OP. – JB Nizet May 18 '12 at 21:23

One benefit would be that if AbstractSample was changed to not implement Sample, the first declaration would still allow you to pass instances of MySample to methods expecting a Sample.

share|improve this answer

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