Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C# WinForms:

The Main goal is to have the fastest approach to read/write a huge file, like a 1 GB file. I know some about StreamReader and Threads in C# but I have also seen stuff about Async File I/O with C# but I haven't learned it yet. So my question is that does taking the approach of Async naturally provide a better performance over the normal StreamReader and multiple threads approach?

share|improve this question
1  
1 GiB is huge? o.ô –  Joey May 18 '12 at 21:31
1  
Well huge is relative. :) –  Umair May 18 '12 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well async also creates a background thread, but the plus side is that you will not have to manage it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok so Async doesn't have performance and does the same as background thread but still it is easier to use because we don't have to worry about managing it. –  BDotA May 18 '12 at 21:39
    
Not too sure on the performance benefits (or lack thereof), but yes it will hide the actual implementation of performing code asynchronously away, freeing you of maintaining the thread related stuff. But definitely test the two procedures, see if there are any noticeable differences (I suspect there will not be much!) –  Umair May 18 '12 at 21:47

Using the async variants is probably a slightly lighter approach. The system handles the asynchronous read/writes for you and you don't have to create and manage a thread in your own code.

If in doubt, though, the usual advice applies: Measure! Write two test routines and test how well they perform.

share|improve this answer
    
well first I wanted to know if Async helps with that or not. Because I don't know how to use Async so before spending time on Learning it I wanted to know if it is worth of time,,, –  BDotA May 18 '12 at 21:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.