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I've got three items on the top of my web page. I expect them to be located left, center, and right. However, that one in the center is a bugger (partially because it's created late in the game). I've tried the auto margin tricks with no luck. I've tried relative positioning but can't get it perfectly centered (and it draws on its neighbors). In the full code below, can you get the "showInMiddle" centered? You need to click the login button for that item to show up. Ideally, the items would wrap if the page was too narrow but still maintain their alignment (rather than drawing on top of each other or all on the left).

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>This is dumb</title>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://knockoutjs.com/js/knockout-2.1.0.js"></script>
</head>
<body style="font-family: 'Segoe UI'; margin: 5px 20px;">

<header style="width: 100%">

<h4 id="showOnLeft" style="font-size: 1.1em; display: inline;">I'm the title</h4>

<span id="showInMiddle" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn">
    I'm supposed to be in the middle with my two buttons.
    <button>B1</button>
    <button>B2</button>
</span>

<div id="showOnRight" style="display: inline; float: right">
    <form id="someLoginForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: !LoggedIn(), submit: login" action="" method="post">
        <input type="text" placeholder="Username" />
        <input type="password" placeholder="Password" />
        <input type="submit" value="Login" />
    </form>
    <form id="someLogoutForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn(), submit: logout" action="" method="post">
        <span>Howdy</span>
        <input type="submit" value="Logout" />
    </form>
</div>

<nav><hr/></nav>

</header>

<script type="text/javascript">

    function LoginViewModel() {
        var self = this;
        self.LoggedIn = ko.observable(false);
        self.login = function (formElement) { self.LoggedIn(true); };
        self.logout = function (formElement) { self.LoggedIn(false); };
    }

    ko.applyBindings(new LoginViewModel());

</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Check out jsfiddle.net –  Šime Vidas May 18 '12 at 23:06
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3 Answers

You cannot center a span because it's an inline element which doesn't know its width by default.

You can simply replace span with div like this (watch the inline CSS):

<div id="showInMiddle" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn" style="text-align:center ">
I'm supposed to be in the middle with my two buttons.
<button>B1</button>
<button>B2</button>
</div>

This is quick - I am off to go home. Try adjusting the width where the login form is concerned. You need to be aware that the total of floatdiv should never exceed the total of container or it will go wrong.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>
            This is dumb
        </title>
        <style>
        #container {
            width:900px; 
            margin: auto 0; 
            overflow: auto;           

        }        
        .floatdiv {
            float:left;

            margin:0;                        

        }

        </style>        

    </head>  

    <body style="font-family: 'Segoe UI'; margin: 5px 20px;">
    <div id="container">

            <div class="floatdiv" style="font-size: 1.1em; width:200px">
                I'm the title                                                                
            </div>
            <div class="floatdiv" id="showInMiddle" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn" style="text-align:center; width:300px ">

                <button>
                    B1
                </button>
                <button>
                    B2
                </button>             
            </div>
            <div class="floatdiv" id="showOnRight" style="width:300px; float:right; text-align:right">
                <form id="someLoginForm" style="" data-bind="visible: !LoggedIn(), submit: login" action="" method="post">
                    <input type="text" placeholder="Username" />
                    <input type="password" placeholder="Password" />
                    <input type="submit" value="Login" />
                </form>
                <form id="someLogoutForm" style="" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn(), submit: logout" action="" method="post">
                    <span>
                        Howdy
                    </span>
                    <input type="submit" value="Logout" />
                </form>
            </div>

        </header>
  </div>        

    </body>

</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This is correct, you can however adjust its positioning. See this stackoverflow.com/questions/8792343/… –  IndigoIdentity May 18 '12 at 23:25
    
This solution doesn't work. Not only does it put the middle element on its own line, but it forces the right-hand element onto a third line. I want all three items on the same line/row. –  Brannon May 18 '12 at 23:49
    
Actually, that would require a rewrite of your HTML... which is quite easy. Want to see it? –  netrox May 18 '12 at 23:50
    
Of course I want to see it. Show me the money! –  Brannon May 18 '12 at 23:52
    
Your update is closer, but still not correct. The inclusion of the second "float: left" puts the centered stuff on the far left of the title. –  Brannon May 19 '12 at 0:20
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It ends up that this works flawlessly when you use a table. Who knew?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>This is dumb</title>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://knockoutjs.com/js/knockout-2.1.0.js"></script>

    <style type="text/css">
        table, tr, td, h4, div { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
    </style>
</head>
<body style="font-family: 'Segoe UI'; margin: 5px 20px;">

<header style="width: 100%">

<table style="width: 100%; border-width: 0px;">
<tr>
<td><h4 id="showOnLeft" style="font-size: 1.1em;">I'm the title</h4></td>
<td>
<div id="showInMiddle" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn" style="text-align: center;">
    I'm supposed to be in the middle with my two buttons.
    <button>B1</button>
    <button>B2</button>
</div>
</td>
<td>
<div id="showOnRight" style="text-align: right;">
    <form id="someLoginForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: !LoggedIn(), submit: login" action="" method="post">
        <input type="text" placeholder="Username" />
        <input type="password" placeholder="Password" />
        <input type="submit" value="Login" />
    </form>
    <form id="someLogoutForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn(), submit: logout" action="" method="post">
        <span>Howdy</span>
        <input type="submit" value="Logout" />
    </form>
</div>
</td>
</tr>
</table>

<nav><hr/></nav>

</header>

<script type="text/javascript">

    function LoginViewModel() {
        var self = this;
        self.LoggedIn = ko.observable(false);
        self.login = function (formElement) { self.LoggedIn(true); };
        self.logout = function (formElement) { self.LoggedIn(false); };
    }

    ko.applyBindings(new LoginViewModel());

</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I'd suggest a table which is much easier but we'd get frowns from web developers. But personally, don't worry.. it works just fine for now. :) –  netrox May 19 '12 at 3:59
    
Tables are not all bad... In my opinion to build an entire layout using one causes issues when rendering on certain browsers and at certain resolutions... But using tables for certain parts of the layout and coding them corectly to avoid the mentioned flaws, usually works fine for me. Just a bit more tricky to style in a compatible way. –  IndigoIdentity May 19 '12 at 10:29
    
Current HTML standards emphasize that tables convey tabular data (spreadsheets, calendar, etc), not be used as a layout. But as a layout, boy, HTML tables are incredibly effective, consistent, and intuitive. It behaves consistently across all browsers with all properties set to zero. But with CSS3, you can specify which elements should be treated as a "table" meaning that you can design layouts with elements that are treated as "table" - more info at digital-web.com/articles/everything_you_know_about_CSS_Is_wrong –  netrox May 19 '12 at 16:35
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This basic tutorial comes from a Deamweaver template, but should be able to put you on track as far as styling things in this manner go. Try floats as my example uses?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>This is dumb</title>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://knockoutjs.com/js/knockout-2.1.0.js"></script>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<style type="text/css">
<!--
/* ~~ this fixed width container surrounds all other elements ~~ */
.container {
    width: 960px;
    background: #FFF;
    margin: 0 auto; /* the auto value on the sides, coupled with the width, centers the layout */
}
.content {

    padding: 0;
}
/* ~~ miscellaneous float/clear classes ~~ */
.fltrt {  /* this class can be used to float an element right in your page. The floated element must precede the element it should be next to on the page. */
    float: right;
    margin-left: 8px;
}
.fltlft { /* this class can be used to float an element left in your page. The floated element must precede the element it should be next to on the page. */
    float: left;
    margin-right: 8px;
}
.clearfloat { /* this class can be placed on a <br /> or empty div as the final element following the last floated div (within the #container) if the overflow:hidden on the .container is removed */
    clear:both;
    height:0;
    font-size: 1px;
    line-height: 0px;
}
-->
</style>
</head>

<body>

<div class="container">
  <div class="content">

    <div class="fltlft">I'm the title</div>
    <div class="fltlft">I'm supposed to be in the middle with my two buttons.
    <button>B1</button>
    <button>B2</button></div>
    <div class="fltlft"> <form id="someLoginForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: !LoggedIn(), submit: login" action="" method="post">
        <input type="text" placeholder="Username" />
        <input type="password" placeholder="Password" />
        <input type="submit" value="Login" />
    </form>
    <form id="someLogoutForm" style="display: inline;" data-bind="visible: LoggedIn(), submit: logout" action="" method="post">
        <span>Howdy</span>
        <input type="submit" value="Logout" />
    </form></div>
  <!-- end .container --></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
There's lots of unnecessary garbage in this answer. –  Jivings May 18 '12 at 23:31
    
I can't understand what you're trying to accomplish here with a fltlft on all three header items. –  Brannon May 18 '12 at 23:56
    
@Brannon floating all 3 left in this manner will result in the 3 divs being placed in that order, side by side. You can place content underneath this but you must assign something with the clrflt class to it... Usually a <br /> tag as suggested. Tables will allow you to do what you have had in mind, but you will find them very tricky in regards to resizing during multiple screen resolutions. –  IndigoIdentity May 19 '12 at 10:18
    
@Brannon You could also define the content class as margin: 0 auto; which should center the block entirely in relation to its container. Then play around with the inner div widths to make them suit what you had in mind as far as the layout goes. 33% for each should make them uniform. –  IndigoIdentity May 19 '12 at 10:23
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