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Why was the switch statement designed to need a break?

I have this:

switch(i)
{
  case a:
  {
   //code
  }
  case b:
  {
   //code
  }
  case c:
  {
   //code
  }
}

If i == a, will the code in b and c be executed or must I put a break; in each one?

Thanks,

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marked as duplicate by Mark Wilkins, Blue Moon, Mitch Dempsey, Cody Gray, kapa May 19 '12 at 1:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Yes. [filler...] –  Michael Burr May 18 '12 at 23:40
2  
Yes, you need a break. :) –  Ken White May 18 '12 at 23:41
    
Geez, why all the -1's, yes, I can easily test this but I thought it would be useful for others. –  Milo May 18 '12 at 23:45
11  
@Milo It says on the vote-down button "This question does not show any research effort; (...)". This is a question that can easily be tested, and thus doesn't show much research effort. –  Simon André Forsberg May 18 '12 at 23:46
4  
Braces: { } Parentheses: ( ) Brackets: [ ] –  dave May 19 '12 at 0:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Must I put a break; in each one?

Yes, if you only want a single case to execute. Alternatively, other control flow statements can also cause a switch to be exited, like return or throw.

If you were to replace //code with, say, std::cout << "case [x]" << std::endl, the answer would be readily apparent.

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yes, the breaks are needed for it to work correctly. The brackets only introduce a scope, they do not effect flow control.

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Not in the last one, even though it is good practice to do so.

If you don't put in break in one, then the current case and all continuing cases will execute until the next break, throw, or return.

This is useful in cases where you want two case sections to execute the same code, you can write:

case a:
case b:
   // ... some code...
   break;

Which would execute for both a and b.

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