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In the end, I have decided that this isn't a problem that I particularly need to fix, however it bothers me that I don't understand why it is happening.

Basically, I have some checkboxes, and I only want the users to be able to select a certain number of them. I'm using the code below to achieve that effect.


$j( function () {
    $j('input[type=checkbox].vote_item').click( function() {
        var numLeft = (+$j('#vote_num').text());
        console.log(numLeft);
        if ( numLeft == 0 && this.checked ) {
            alert('I\'m sorry, you have already voted for the number of items that you are allowed to vote for.');
            return false;
        } else {
            if ( this.checked == true ) {
                $j('#vote_num').html(numLeft-1);
            } else {
                $j('#vote_num').html(numLeft+1);
            }
        }
    });
});

And when I was testing it, I noticed that if I used:


$j('input[type=checkbox]').each( function () {
    this.click()
});

The Javascript reacted as I would expect, however when used with:


$j('input[type=checkbox]').each( function () {
    $j(this).click()
});

It would actually make the counter count UP.

I do realize that it isn't the most secure way to keep count using the counter, however I do have server side error-checking that prevents more than the requisite amount from being entered in the database, that being the reason that I have decided that it doesn't actually need fixing.

Edit: The $j is due to the fact that I have to use jQuery in noConflict mode...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The fact that counter is going up gave me the clue that there is a link between checked attribute, which you are using, and firing the click event manually.

I searched Google for 'jquery checkbox click event raise' and found this link, where author faces the exact same problem and the workaround he used.

http://www.bennadel.com/blog/1525-jQuery-s-Event-Triggering-Order-Of-Default-Behavior-And-triggerHandler-.htm

On a side note, I think you can simplify your code further:

$j('input[type=checkbox].vote_item').click( 
function() 
{
    var maxNumberOfChoices = 5;

    //get number of checked checkboxes. 
    var currentCheckedCount = $j('input[type=checkbox].vote_item :checked');

    if(currentCheckedCount > maxNumberOfChoices)
    {
        //It's useful if you show how many choices user can make. :)
        alert('You can only select maximum ' + maxNumberOfChoices + ' checkboxes.');
        return false;
    }

    return true;
});
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$(this) contains a jQuery wrapper (with lots of functions) whereas this is solely the DOM object.

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That I understand, however...what exactly is the difference between the functions? And does jQuery change the functionality of other DOM events when triggered through a jQuery-wrapped element? –  Thomas Jun 30 '09 at 21:21

this.click() calls the browser DOM method click().

$(this).click() calls the jQuery method click(), which does more than just call the browser method: see the implementation of the function trigger for details.

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