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I'm hosting my website in a shared server, so my options are limited. For instance, I don't have access to the exec function.

My problem is that my very easy addLog PHP function needs rights to write into log files. I had read in another post that the PHP user is usually assimilated as "others" in the traditional UNIX owner-group-other permission scheme.

However, since I built my own www structure, I was thinking of letting my ./log directory's permissions be set to 777 so the script could write to the necessary logs.

The application only needs to be able to write to the log files; no read or execute permissions are necessary. (I don't even know what they are when it comes to UNIX permissions) Additionally, I am not storing any database information in the logs; I may, however, store stack traces.

  • Is there a security risk to set the log directory's permissions to 777?
    There's nothing in this folder except logs.
  • Are the read and execute rights necessary on this directory?
    I only really need to write (append) into the logs.
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That depends on how that shared hosting is set up –  zerkms May 19 '12 at 0:09
    
it could be a very bad idea, for example, if the log folder is accessible via web, and it allows executing scripts –  wroniasty May 19 '12 at 0:12
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@wroniasty: 777 on directory has nothing to do with it allows executing scripts. Also - 777 doens't give any additional privileges when you access it through http –  zerkms May 19 '12 at 0:14
    
@zerkms, could you detail how the shared hosting setup would impact my decision please? –  Sebas May 19 '12 at 0:16
    
@Sebas: that depends on what other hosting users could do. And I'm not sure anyone can guess for sure for your particular case (we don't even know what hosting you use) –  zerkms May 19 '12 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

Remember that it is possible that an application error could contain database login information, query strings, as well as file structure of your application. There may be certain files that you have hidden from users and robots, but are still in the document root. By allowing anybody (777) on the shared environment to view the log (any) files you open yourself to more risk.

If PHP is writing the log it should also be able to read the log, in theory. Bottom line is making the file owner the same user that will be writing to the file. Then use appropriate permissions.

Of course if you are not concerned with anything on your site being secure, and there are no DB connections, it really doesn't matter.

Really depends on the shared environment. I have seen poorly set up shared hosting where users are able to FTP traverse and view others files/folders. 777 is not a good idea on shared hosting. (Better to be safe, than sorry)

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It's terribly wrong answer. Filesystem permissions have not much to do with availability through http –  zerkms May 19 '12 at 0:10
    
Yes, you are right, but on shared hosting it is could be WIDE open to other users on the box. –  Adam Culp May 19 '12 at 0:14
    
it is opened, so what? And HOW it is related to DB?!? –  zerkms May 19 '12 at 0:15
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If error messages are logged it could contain DB connection strings, or SQL statements ran by the scripts. –  Adam Culp May 19 '12 at 0:16
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Really depends on the shared environment. I have seen poorly set up shared hosting where users are able to FTP traverse and view others files/folders. 777 is not a good idea on shared hosting. (Better to be safe, than sorry) –  Adam Culp May 19 '12 at 0:20

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