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I'm trying to write a script in Ruby to parse a Wikipedia article using Nokogiri and CSS selectors. I'm a little confused about conditionals within the script though. Here's what I have so far (page is the downloaded html using Nokogiri):

page.css('h3').each do |node|
  puts node.text
end

page.css('li').each do |node|   
  if /\d|\D/.match(node)
    puts node.text.scan(/[\d]+\D*/).first
  end
end

page.css('td b').each do |node|
  puts node.text
end

This all works fine. However, what I really want is something like this:

page.css('h3, li, td b').each do |node|
  # if it's an h3 node, do one thing
  # if it's a li node, do another thing
  # else if it's a 'td b' node, do another thing
end

This would allow the page to be parsed in order, instead of going through the body three separate times. However, I'm not sure how to write those conditionals within my script.

EDIT: So now my script is

page.css('h3, li, td b').each do |node|
        case node.name
        when 'h3', 'b'
            puts node.text
        when 'li'
            if /\d|\D/.match(node)
                puts node.text.scan(/[\d]+\D*/).first
            end
        else
            next
    end
end

However, it hasn't changed the behavior. It processes them in the same order it did before (all the 'h3' elements, then all the 'li' elements, then all the 'b' elements).

EDIT 2:

Okay, I finally got it to work. Here was my final set of conditionals:

page.traverse do |node|
    case
            when 'h3' == node.name 
            puts node.text
        when 'li' == node.name 
            puts node.text.scan(/[\d]+\D*/).first if /\d|\D/.match(node)
        when 'b' == node.name
            puts node.text if (node.parent.name == 'p' or node.parent.name == 'td')
    end
end

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
As noted by Mark below, there's absolutely nothing wrong with what you have right now, and leaving them separate is better than combining them. –  Andrew Marshall May 19 '12 at 1:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might be looking for traverse:

page.traverse do |node|
  case
    when ['h3', 'li'].include?(node.name) then puts node.text
    when 'b' == node.name && 'td' == node.parent.name then puts node.text[/\d+\D*/]
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me. Thanks! –  Mason May 19 '12 at 2:12
    
Question: I'm getting everything I want, but I'm also getting random blank lines in my output. Can you think of any reason for this off the top of your head? –  Mason May 19 '12 at 4:37
    
Hmm you might want to change it to: puts $1 if node.text[/\d+\D*/] –  pguardiario May 19 '12 at 4:54
    
No luck. What is the $1 supposed to do? –  Mason May 20 '12 at 1:08
    
It's just a shorter way to write your regex line. Try node.text.strip / $1.strip you've either got an extra newline or an empty text. –  pguardiario May 20 '12 at 3:07

With Nokogiri the page will not be parsed three separate times, even in your first scenario. Nokogiri parses the page once, creates an in-memory DOM, then uses the DOM to look up the nodes you want. It's not inefficient to perform multiple CSS or XPath lookups.

Nevertheless, if you still want to grab all nodes at once, you can do:

page.css('h3, li, td b').each do |node|
  case node.name
  when 'h3'
    do_something
  when 'li'
    do_something_else
  when 'b'
    do_another_thing
end

Note if you needed to differentiate between, say a td b and a p b then this technique won't work. I'd recommend separate lookups.

share|improve this answer
    
See my edit. Tried what you suggested without much luck (I don't think). –  Mason May 19 '12 at 1:39
1  
Ah, based on your edits I see you wanted to make sure they were processed in document order. My assumption was that you were concerned about the performance if it was re-parsing. @pguardiario has the answer you want. –  Mark Thomas May 19 '12 at 13:56

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