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Lets say I have two tables:

table english which has two columns, id and letter:

1,a
2,b
3,c

table greek which has two columns, id and letter:

1,alpha
2,beta
3,gamma

Ok so I execute the query select * from english limit 1,5 and i get:

2,b
3,c

Which is what I would expect. Now I try select english.id,english.letter,greek.letter from english join greek on greek.id=english.id order by english.id asc limit 1,5

2,b,beta
3,c,gama
1,a,alpha
2,b,beta
3,c,gama

What!? why is this set circular? Ok well, this next query works as I would expect:

select english.id,english.letter,greek.letter from english join greek on greek.id=english.id group by english.id order by english.id asc limit 1,5

2,b,beta
3,c,gama

So what the hell is going on here? Why do I need to add the group by english.id for the set to behavior like I would expect?

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Using a LIMIT clause without an ORDER BY doesn't make any sense. –  Vincent Savard May 19 '12 at 0:23
    
@Vincent Savard agreed that was a typo, i had an order by in the real query. –  Rook May 19 '12 at 0:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Probably you have duplicate rows in your greek table.

It works fine when I try it on MySQL 5.5.20: sqlfiddle.

Here's an example where I have deliberately inserted duplicate rows in the greek table and it gives exactly the same results as you get: sqlfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
i don't think so, because then i would have to add a having clause... +1 sqlfiddle is awesome! I updated it a bit and it looks more like what i was getting, but it isn't circular... Also`g_id = english.id` wasn't the query it was actually r_id = english.id which returns the proper set... I am even more confused now. –  Rook May 19 '12 at 0:31
1  
@Rook: Just run a SELECT * FROM greek and you'll see if it has duplicates. –  ypercube May 19 '12 at 0:43
    
@ypercube and Mark Byers good call... –  Rook May 19 '12 at 0:47

LIMIT applies to the whole query. If you want to limit particular table, apply limit to it first

select english.id,english.letter,greek.letter 
from (select * from english limit 1,5) as english
join greek on greek.id=english.id

And you should put ORDER BY on LIMIT clause, unless it's something random

share|improve this answer
    
yeah i did have an order by... –  Rook May 19 '12 at 0:32

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