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I created a very simple node class with a name and an array of nodes. I also created an iterator class with a next method that helps me iterate on each node and child nodes. I need to write the next method, but I don't what is the best way to do it.

class Node

  def initialize(name, nodes
    @name = name
    @nodes = nodes
  end
end

class Iterator
  def initialize(node)
    @node = node
  end

  def next
    ???
  end
end

Example:

z = Node.new("z", [])
b = Node.new("b", [z])    
c = Node.new("c", [])
parent = Node.new("a", [b, c]) 

iterator = Iterator.new(parent)
str = ''
next = iterator.next
while next do
 str += next.name
 next = iterator.next
end

str should equal "abzc"

Can anybody help me with this?

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1  
In your mind, what does "next" mean? There are two common algorithms for traversing a graph- depth first and bredth first. Question is, when you iterate, do you want to see all nodes in one level before any node in the next level? Or do you want to traverse a branch all the way down to its leaves before moving on to the next branch? Either way, the algorithm involves recursion. Happy to help more if you can elaborate on your requirement. –  Kent Rancourt May 19 '12 at 1:43
    
I want to traverse all branch all the way down –  Paul S. May 19 '12 at 1:55
    
From the OP example, it looks like depth-first (else str should equal "abcz" instead of "abzc"). –  Scott Hunter May 19 '12 at 1:55

4 Answers 4

If I may suggest a more idiomatic approach:

class Node

  attr_accessor :name, :children

  def initialize(name, children = [ ])
    @name = name
    @children = children
  end

  def traverse(&block)
    yield self
    @children.each { |child| child.traverse(&block) }
  end

end

z = Node.new("z")
b = Node.new("b", [z])
c = Node.new("c")
parent = Node.new("a", [b, c])

str = ''
parent.traverse { |node| str += node.name }
puts str

This has a benefit over btilly's solution (which is also correct) in that it doesn't proliferate Iterator objects and suck up memory- in fact Iterator disappears from the implementation (while still retaining the ability to DO something to each node in succession). This is more idiomatic; more Ruby-esque.

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This works but i must iterate through the "next" method. –  Paul S. May 19 '12 at 19:22
    
@Paul, can you explain perhaps why the next() approach is required? Seems to be a strange requirement since it is at odds with the "ruby way" of doing things. –  Kent Rancourt May 20 '12 at 7:03
    
Because the teacher wants it that way? –  Nigel Thorne May 20 '12 at 14:05
    
Yes it is an exercise, is has to be done that way... –  Paul S. May 20 '12 at 16:24

In your iterator, if node has any children, next would be the first of them. If it doesn't, then you need to "back up" to the last sibling that you skipped over. This implies that you need to keep track of the siblings that have been skipped over, so that you can go back to them.

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Could you explain that again with pseudocode? –  Paul S. May 19 '12 at 2:40

Here is some running code that demonstrates what I think you're looking for.

class Node
  attr_accessor :name, :nodes

  def initialize(name, nodes)
    @name = name
    @nodes = nodes
  end
end

class Iterator
  def initialize(node)
    @node = node
  end

  def each_node
    yield @node
    for node in @node.nodes do
      iterator = Iterator.new(node)
      iterator.each_node {|next_node|
        yield next_node
      }
    end
  end
end

z = Node.new("z", [])
b = Node.new("b", [z])
c = Node.new("c", [])
parent = Node.new("a", [b, c])

iterator = Iterator.new(parent)
str = ''
iterator.each_node {|node|
  str += node.name
}
puts str
share|improve this answer
    
It needs to be recursive. In you code you assume that there is only 2 level depths. For example, Z could have nodes as well. –  Paul S. May 19 '12 at 2:36
    
And I can't use a each_node method. It must be next. –  Paul S. May 19 '12 at 2:46
    
@PaulS. try running it. My code is recursive. Add in a node below z and it shows up correctly. As for using next, on my ancient ruby 1.8.6 your code snippet broke. If you understand how my code works, you should be able to modify it to work in the way that you want. (Though given that next is a key word in Ruby, it is a poor choice of variable name...) –  btilly May 19 '12 at 4:05

I have been able to solve my problem by doing the following. But what I don't like with this approach is that I traverse the nodes during the initialization instead of in the next method...

class Iterator

  def initialize(node)
    @node   = node
    @index  = -1
    @list   = []

    traverse(@node)
  end

  def next
    @index += 1
    @list[@index]
  end

  private
  def traverse(root)
    @list[@list.size] = root
    if root.nodes
      for n in root.nodes do
        traverse(n)
      end
    end  
  end

end
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