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I'm renaming the majority of the variables in a data frame and I'm not really impressed with my method.

Therefore, does anyone on SO have a smarter or faster way then the one presented below using only base?

    data(mtcars)
  # head(mtcars)


  temp.mtcars <- mtcars
  names(temp.mtcars) <- c((x <- c("mpg", "cyl", "disp")), 
                           gsub('^', "baR.", setdiff(names (mtcars),x)))
  str(temp.mtcars)
  'data.frame': 32 obs. of  11 variables:
   $ mpg     : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
   $ cyl     : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
   $ disp    : num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
   $ baR.hp  : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
   $ baR.drat: num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
   $ baR.wt  : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
   $ baR.qsec: num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
   $ baR.vs  : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
   $ baR.am  : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
   $ baR.gear: num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
   $ baR.carb: num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ...
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2  
This is the sort of question where I'm tempted to respond with a very simple answer using only paste and subsetting, except that I'm sure there's a reason you've made it this complicated that you just haven't explained fully. –  joran May 19 '12 at 5:06
    
@joran I suspect the reason is that subsetting assumes your original names of vectors is in the correct order of the names of your object. –  Andrie May 19 '12 at 6:38
    
@joran, please do. I would be very thankful for a simpler solution. That's why I posted this question. –  Eric Fail May 19 '12 at 9:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use ifelse:

names(temp.mtcars) <- ifelse(names(mtcars) %in% c("mpg", "cyl", "disp"),
                             names(mtcars),
                             paste("bar", names(mtcars), sep = "."))
share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution as it does not create any new objects. Also, it can easily be made into a function. Thanks. –  Eric Fail May 20 '12 at 6:49
    
Just be careful - this assumes the order of your new names are the same as the existing names. –  Andrie May 20 '12 at 8:05
    
@Andrie, I'm not sure I understand what the problem is. What I am looking for is a way of renaming all variables, except a subset; I don't understand how ordering can be an issue. I would appreciate it if you explain the problem. Thanks. –  Eric Fail May 20 '12 at 21:02
    
Also beware of recycling! This example works because the true and false conditions are the same length. If they are not, you get weirdness: stackoverflow.com/q/16110859/419842 –  Nathan VanHoudnos Apr 19 '13 at 18:20

Edited for answer using base R only

The package plyr has a convenient function rename() that does what you ask. Your modified question specifies using base R only. One easy way of doing this is to simply copy the code from plyr::rename and create your own function.

rename <- function (x, replace) {
  old_names <- names(x)
  new_names <- unname(replace)[match(old_names, names(replace))]
  setNames(x, ifelse(is.na(new_names), old_names, new_names))
}

The function rename takes an argument that is a named vector, where the elements of the vectors are the new names, and the names of the vector are the existing names. There are many ways to construct such a named vector. In the example below I simply use structure.

x <- c("mpg", "disp", "wt")
some.names <- structure(paste0("baR.", x), names=x)
some.names
       mpg       disp         wt 
 "baR.mpg" "baR.disp"   "baR.wt" 

Now you are ready to rename:

mtcars  <- rename(mtcars, replace=some.names)

The results:

'data.frame':   32 obs. of  11 variables:
 $ baR.mpg : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
 $ cyl     : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
 $ baR.disp: num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
 $ hp      : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
 $ drat    : num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
 $ baR.wt  : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
 $ qsec    : num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
 $ vs      : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
 $ am      : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ gear    : num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
 $ carb    : num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for responding to my question. The thing is your solution adds a suffix, not a prefix. Also, I'm looking for a solution using base only. –  Eric Fail May 19 '12 at 9:29
    
@EricFail Answer edited. –  Andrie May 19 '12 at 10:40
    
Thanks, only thing is that your newest function renames the selected variables and not the remaining variables. Also, it reorder the data, but thanks. I appreciate you took the time. –  Eric Fail May 20 '12 at 6:48

Nearly the same but without plyr:

data(mtcars)

temp.mtcars <- mtcars

carNames <- names(temp.mtcars)
modifyNames <- !(carNames %in% c("mpg", "cyl", "disp"))

names(temp.mtcars)[modifyNames] <- paste("baR.", carNames[modifyNames], sep="")

Output:

str(temp.mtcars)
'data.frame':   32 obs. of  11 variables:
$ mpg     : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
$ cyl     : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
$ disp    : num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
$ baR.hp  : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
$ baR.drat: num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
$ baR.wt  : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
$ baR.qsec: num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
$ baR.vs  : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
$ baR.am  : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
$ baR.gear: num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
$ baR.carb: num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ...
share|improve this answer
1  
Take care. This solution assumes your names are in the same order as in the object you are renaming. –  Andrie May 19 '12 at 17:22
    
Thank you for answering my question. –  Eric Fail May 20 '12 at 6:51

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