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I was trying to return an array from child_prog() to main() in file1.c. I try to give the pseudo code below.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int* child_prog(int some_input);

void main(void){
  int C[10];
  int some_input;
  C = child_prog(some_input);
}

int* child_prog(int some_input){
  static int out[10];
  ...
  .../*some wizardry*/
  return out;
}

Now the compiler generates an error saying that it can not assign to C (which is an int[] type) the value returned from child_prog (which is an int* type). Although, the program works fine when I make C an int* and malloc is 10 ints of memory. I cant understand why the compiler can't assign to C (an array defined as C[10] and hence a pointer) the value returned from child_prog (an array defined as static int out[10] and hence again a pointer).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. You cannot assign to an array. You need to memcpy it.
  2. int* != int[] while the first is a pointer that might point to an int of a sequence of ints, the second is a sequence of ints
  3. You can use int *C; and pass the length of the array (if unknown at compile time) as an out parameter.
  4. static int out[10]; is not a malloced, but static.
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Ok, understood point number-1 that int*!=int[]. But, in the case when I define C as int* C instead of int C[], and malloc it the known amount of memory, and child_prog returns to C the pointer to the static int array, shouldn't I be able to bypass the need to do memcpy? –  Abhinav May 19 '12 at 6:17
    
If you are not assigning to an array, but to a pointer, you don't need memcpy. –  MByD May 19 '12 at 6:18
    
Thanks for slaying a lot of my dragons ... rather quickly –  Abhinav May 19 '12 at 6:24

One solution can be to declare C as:

int *C;

as said by Binyamin You cannot change the address of an array as it is statically allocated, which precisely you are trying to do with:

C = child_prog(some_input);
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Yes, got it now. Thanks for your reply. –  Abhinav May 19 '12 at 6:25
  • The type of int [] is int * const which means the memory it points to is a constant and trying to change it will give a compiler error. Obviously it isn't equal to int *.
  • The variable out in child_prog() is statically allocated which means its not on the stack but somewhere in the global data section. Hence no matter how many times you call child_prog(), you'll always be returned the same memory location.
  • Hence to copy the array, do a memcpy(dest,src,bytes) if you want to save the data returned from child_prog().
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Thanks for the reply. –  Abhinav May 19 '12 at 6:30
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define SUCCESS    0 
#define FAILURE    1 

int child_prog(int some_input, int *output, int output_size);

void main(void){
  int C[10];
  int some_input;
  C = child_prog(some_input, c, 10);
}

int  child_prog(int some_input, int *output, int output_size)
{
  static int source[10];
      ...
      .../*some wizardry*/

  memcpy(output, source, output_size);


     ... if (erronous Condition)
             return FAILURE;
         else

  return SUCCESS;
}
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