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I'm learning about threads now. I'm wondering if it is possible to pass a variable to my thread. My assignement is to create a thread and assign a number (a name if you will) to each thread and print the number every 100ms. my current program is as below :

#define PCHECK(sts,msg) if((sts)!=0){printf("error : %s\n",msg); exit(EXIT_FAILURE)}
#define NB_THREAD 5

void* do_nothing(void* data)
{
    int i;

    //printf("creation thread %d",(int)data);
    while(1)
    {
        usleep(100000);
    printf("thread number : %d \n",data);
    }
    i = 0;
    pthread_exit(NULL);   
    //exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int pid, j, status;
    pthread_t thread;
    int * res;
    int stat;

    for (j = 0; j < NB_THREAD; j++)
    {
        stat = pthread_create(&thread, NULL, do_nothing, (void *) j );
        if (stat !=0)
        {
            perror ("pthread_create()");
        }
    }
    for (j = 0; j < NB_THREAD; j++)
    {
        pthread_join(thread, (void **) &res );
    }



    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

for the moment the only number getting printed is 0 (the value of data). Can someone point out where did i went wrong thanks :)

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2 Answers

Here are some good examples of how to pass arguments to pthreads

[1] https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/pthreads/#PassingArguments

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1  
many thanks, this link is very helpful, covers everything about threads. Gonna have a easier time with my lessons now :) –  kaninabu May 19 '12 at 7:49
    
Sure . you may also want to explore the thread stack , thread private data .. –  Jay D May 19 '12 at 8:27
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I suspect that your problem might be that your running this on a 64-bit system that uses 32-bit int types. So data is a 64-bit void* type but in your thread function you're printing it out as a 32-bit int:

// example assumes that this thread instance was started by
//   pthread_create(&thread, NULL, do_nothing, (void *) j ) when
//   j == 1

printf("thread number : %d \n",data);
                         ^       ^
                         |       +--------  passing a 64-bit pointer 0x00000000.00000001
                         |
                         +----------------  treats the pointer argument as a 32-bit int and
                                            happens to only see the all-zero 32-bits

I suspect that you'll get the output you expect if you change the printf() to:

printf("thread number : %d \n", (int) data);

As a general rule, when writing thread functions I think it's a good idea to have the first actions of the thread function be to convert the data item passed to the thread function to the type that was actually passed to pthread_create():

void* do_nothing(void* data)
{
    int id = (int) data; // `pthread_create()` was passed an `int`
                         //    `data` is not used again after this point

    // ...
}

A few other points

  • if you pass an actual pointer to data to the thread function, make sure that each thread gets their own separate copy (unless the data is supposed to be the same instance for each thread, which is possible but uncommon).

  • if you're spinning up multiple threads you either need to keep each pthread_t object returned by pthread_create() (in an array, maybe) so you can join on them later, or you need to call pthread_join()/pthread_detach() before reusing the pthread_t object so that the system can clean up any resources it has allocated for that thread when the thread finished running. In the example as posted that might not matter much because the threads will run forever (or until something kills the process). The pthread_join() call you have will never complete successfully.

    But the following code is destined to break when you change things so the thread function stops after some amount of time:

    for (j = 0; j < NB_THREAD; j++)
    {
        pthread_join(thread, (void **) &res );
    }
    

    Because thread only has the pthread_t for the last thread created, once it successfully joins it's not valid to use any more. The next loop iteration will try to join a thread that's already been joined and is no longer valid.

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