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I am trying to work out how to scan a text file of a conversation find how many positive words and negative words there are. The positive and negative words are contained within two separate text files which are used to 'scan' the conversation text file.

After it finds the number of positive and negative words I am trying to get it to tally each up and then tell me if there are more positive or negative words found.

I have the code below so far, it only gives me a count on the positive words. I am not looking at something like NLP at this stage just something on a much more basic level.

I think I have the second part looking for the negative words in the wrong location. And I think I need to use a boolean to tell me if there are more positive or negative words found, but I can't work out how to do it.

I am pretty stuck as I am new to Java, and programing in general.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

package omgilisearch;

import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class SentimentTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
          printAllCounts(
            readWordFile("ConversationTest.txt", loadKeywords("PositiveWords.txt")));
        }
    public static void main1(String[] args) throws Exception {
          printAllCounts(
            readWordFile("ConversationTest.txt", loadKeywords("NegativeWords.txt")));
        }

        private static Map<String, Integer> readWordFile(
          String fname, Set<String> keywords) throws FileNotFoundException
        {
          final Map<String, Integer> frequencyData = new TreeMap<String, Integer>();
          for (Scanner wordFile = new Scanner(new FileReader(fname)); 
            wordFile.hasNext();) 
          {
            final String word = wordFile.next();
            if (keywords.contains(word)) 
              frequencyData.put(word, getCount(word, frequencyData) + 1);
          }
          return frequencyData;
        }


        private static void printAllCounts(Map<String, Integer> frequencyData) {
          System.out.println("-----------------------------------------------");
          System.out.println(" Occurrences Word");
          for(Map.Entry<String, Integer> e : frequencyData.entrySet())
            System.out.printf("%15d %s\n", e.getValue(), e.getKey());
          System.out.println("-----------------------------------------------");
        }

        private static int getCount(String word, Map<String, Integer> frequencyData) {
            return frequencyData.containsKey(word)? frequencyData.get(word) : 0;
        }

        private static Set<String> loadKeywords(String fname) 
        throws FileNotFoundException 
        {
          final Set<String> result = new HashSet<String>();
          for (Scanner s = new Scanner(new FileReader(fname)); s.hasNext();) 
            result.add(s.next());
          return result;
        }
}
share|improve this question
1  
For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. (You would need to hard-code the +/-ve words and the test text). –  Andrew Thompson May 19 '12 at 7:29
    
BTW - is 'not negative' 2 -ve words, or 1 +ve phrase? –  Andrew Thompson May 19 '12 at 7:31
    
Sorry Andrew, not following what you are asking in your second comment? –  Eagle Eye May 19 '12 at 7:42
    
What is main1 good for? –  home May 19 '12 at 8:05
    
'not negative' is a 'double negative' or a 'positive'. :) –  Andrew Thompson May 19 '12 at 8:08

4 Answers 4

You would have to have some array of so called "bad" words (wich are hard coded) and then iterate through the whole text file and compare every word in the array with the word you currently inspecting. If the word matches with one of the words in the array, then increase some variable that is holding the amount of badwords eg. badWords++;. I believe this approach should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Could't I basically get a "Total" count for each (i.e. Positive and Negative words) and then find which ever is greater? –  Eagle Eye May 19 '12 at 8:29
    
Sure, so with the method I stated above you can get the amount of positive and negative words. Once done you can compare both and see which is greater. eg if(badWords > goodWords) { // More bad words } else { // More good words } –  Luke Taylor May 19 '12 at 8:41
    
Hmm...I have never worked with array's, That is a bit more advanced than where I am currently at I think. –  Eagle Eye May 19 '12 at 8:46
    
Arrays aren't that complicated, for your needs you would need something like this: // set up and initialize String[] badWordsHolder = new String[i]; // i would be the number of bad words // Define the words badWordsHolder[0] = "BadWord1"; badWordsHolder[1] = "BadWord2"; // and so on Then you can iterate through the array like so: for(int iteration = 0; iteration < badWordsHolder.length; iteration++) { if(badWordsHolder[iteration] == currentWordInText) { // The word is a bad word } } –  Luke Taylor May 19 '12 at 9:16
    
Something like? : ) –  Eagle Eye May 19 '12 at 9:18
package omgilisearch;

import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class SentimentTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
          printAllCounts(
            readWordFile("ConversationTest.txt"));
        }

private static Map<String, Integer> readWordFile(String string) {

        return null;
    }

String[] goodWordsHolder = new String[3];{

goodWordsHolder[0] = "good"; goodWordsHolder[1] = "great";goodWordsHolder[2] = "excellent";

for(int iteration = 0; iteration < goodWordsHolder.length; iteration++) { String currentWordInText;
if(goodWordsHolder[iteration] == currentWordInText) { }// The word is a bad word } }

private static void printAllCounts(Map<String, Integer> frequencyData) {
          System.out.println("-----------------------------------------------");
          System.out.println(" Occurrences Word");
          for(Map.Entry<String, Integer> e : frequencyData.entrySet())
            System.out.printf("%15d %s\n", e.getValue(), e.getKey());
          System.out.println("-----------------------------------------------");
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This may seem like a silly question but....Why do I need to use an array? Surely with my original code where it gives me a count per word found there is a way to add a variable (integer?) that gives a "Total count"? –  Eagle Eye May 20 '12 at 1:25
package omgilisearch;

import java.io.*;

   public class SentimentTest {     

public static void main(String[] args) {

        String[] lines = new String[0];         
    String path = "ConversationTest.txt";         
    BufferedReader br = null;      
    try {

             File file = new File(path);

        br = new BufferedReader(                  
             new InputStreamReader(                  
             new FileInputStream(file)));             

    String line;             
    while( (line = br.readLine()) != null ) {                 

    lines = add(line, lines);

             }             

    br.close(); 

      } catch(IOException e) {             

    System.out.println("read error: " + e.getMessage());

         }         
    print(lines);     

    }       

    private static String[] add(String s, String[] array) { 

        String[] goodWordsHolder = new String[3];{

        }goodWordsHolder[0] = "good"; goodWordsHolder[1] = "great";goodWordsHolder[2] = "excellent";
        for(int iteration = 0; iteration < goodWordsHolder.length; iteration++) { String currentWordInText = null; if(goodWordsHolder[iteration] == currentWordInText) { }}
        return goodWordsHolder; } 

    private static void print(String[] data) {

       for(int i = 0; i < data.length; i++)             
    System.out.println(data[i]);     
} 

} 
share|improve this answer

Arrays store multiple items of the same information type eg. String[] badWords;. I believe you should use this, since I'm sure you will have more than 1 bad word that you would like to find in the conversation text, if not, then simple use 1 String eg. String badWord;.

I'm not going to write out all the code that will make it work, I'll just give you an algorithm.

public class test {

// The process of picking out all the good and bad words
public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Setting up all the needed variables
        // Set up all the good words
        String[] goodWordsHolder = new String[2];
        goodWordsHolder[0] = "firstGoodWord";
        goodWordsHolder[1] = "secondGoodWord";
        // Set up all the bad words
        String[] badWordsHolder = new String[2];
        badWordsHolder[0] = "firstBadWord";
        badWordsHolder[1] = "secondBadWord";
        // Set up the counters
        int amountOfGoodWords = 0;
        int amountOfBadWords = 0;
        int currentWordInText = 0;
        // boolean that will exit the loop
        boolean ConversationEnded = false;

    while(!ConversationEnded) {
        // Compare the currentWord from the conversation with the hard coded words
        for(int iteration = 0; iteration < goodWordsHolder.length; iteration++) { 
            if(goodWordsHolder[iteration] == getWordInText(currentWordInText)) {
                amountOfGoodWords++;
            }   
        }
        for(int iteration = 0; iteration < badWordsHolder.length; iteration++) { 
            if(badWordsHolder[iteration] == getWordInText(currentWordInText)) {
                amountOfBadWords++;
            }   
        }
        // Increase the current word value so the next time we compare the next word in the conversation will be compared
        currentWordInText++;

        // Check that we haven't reached the end of the conversation
        if(endOfTheConversationHasBeenReached()) {
            // This will exit the while loop
            ConversationEnded = true;
        }
    }

    // Now print all the information to the console
    System.out.println("Amount of good Words: " + amountOfGoodWords);
    System.out.println("Amount of bad Words: " + amountOfBadWords);
    if(amountOfGoodWords > amountOfBadWords) {
        System.out.println("There are more good words than bad words.");
    }
    else {
        System.out.println("There are more bad words than good words.");
    }

}


// The method(s) you'll have to code out yourself. I suggest you read up on the web and so on to assist you with this.

private static String getWordInText(int currentWordInText) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return null;
}

private static boolean endOfTheConversationHasBeenReached() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return false;
}

}

Excuse me if there are any logical errors. The code hasn't been debugged yet. ;) Hopefully this will guide you into the right direction.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Luke, I will have a go at using this as a templarte of sorts. –  Eagle Eye May 23 '12 at 4:55

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