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I'm interested in the worst-case efficiency of stepping forwards and backwards through binary search trees.

Unbalanced tree:

   5
  /
 1 
  \
   2
    \
     3
      \
       4

It looks like the worst case would be 4->5, which takes 4 operations.

Balanced tree:

   2
  / \
 1   4
    / \ 
   3   5

Worst case is 2->3, which takes 2 operations.

Am I right in thinking that the worst case for any BST is O(height-1), which is O(log n) for balanced trees, and O(n-1) for unbalanced trees?

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1  
O(height-1) = O(height)... –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 12:15
    
@OliCharlesworth Yeah, I didn't think O(n-1) made much sense. Cheers! –  Alex L May 19 '12 at 12:16
    
Also, should the binary-tree and binary-search-tree tags be synonyms? –  Alex L May 19 '12 at 12:18
2  
I guess "binary search tree" implies an ordering, whereas "binary tree" just means a generic tree structure. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 12:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Am I right in thinking that the worst case for any BST is O(height-1), which is O(log n) for balanced trees, and O(n-1) for unbalanced trees?

Yes, you will only ever need to go up or down when travelling from k to k+1, never both (because the invariant is left child < parent < right child).

Although O(height-1) can be written O(height) (and similarly for O(n)).

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Why is O(height-1) = O(height)? –  Karl Morrison Apr 4 '13 at 4:41
    
@KarlMorrison: because that's how big-O notation works. It's about behaviour as the parameter heads towards infinity, where all lower-order terms (in this case, 1) become negligible. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 4 '13 at 7:05

If you are considering just traversing the tree in order, the complexity does not change with regards to balance. The algorithm is still

 walk( Node n)
    walk( n.left )
    visit( n )
    walk( n.right )

1 op per step.

It's when you start to apply lookups, inserts and deletes the balance comes into play.

And for these operations to be in O(log N ) a balanced tree is required.

If you are trying to find the next element in the sequence defined by the tree, you may be required to travel the entire height of the tree, and of course in a balanced tree this is O ( log N ), and in an unbalanced tree this is O( N)

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Indeed, 1 op per step. But the number of steps between n and n+1 is not always 1. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 12:22
    
@Oli Yes, the walk(Node n) should work for OP, and the balance will not change the complexity of the traversal. I might be misunderstanding the OP. –  Captain Giraffe May 19 '12 at 12:23

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