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Possible Duplicate:
How do I iterate over each Entry in a Collection Map?

What's the best way to iterate over the items in a HashMap?

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marked as duplicate by jmort253, casperOne Jan 10 '12 at 21:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

19  
And why HashMap, not just any old Map? – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 30 '09 at 23:55
1  
I need to get the keys and values and add them to a multidimensional array – burntsugar Jul 1 '09 at 0:05
7  
How does this have a higher score than the question it's a duplicate of? – immibis Feb 16 '15 at 2:50
1  
In Java 8 using Lambda Expression : stackoverflow.com/a/25616206/1503859 – Nitin Mahesh Jul 25 '15 at 18:33
3  
@immibis probably because a lot of people instinctively use HashMaps without considering other map implementations. Then when they inevitably get stuck trying to iterate over their HashMap they punch "Iterate through a HashMap" into Google, leading them straight here. – Dean Wild Mar 14 at 9:14
up vote 1998 down vote accepted

Iterate through the entrySet like so:

public static void printMap(Map mp) {
    Iterator it = mp.entrySet().iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        Map.Entry pair = (Map.Entry)it.next();
        System.out.println(pair.getKey() + " = " + pair.getValue());
        it.remove(); // avoids a ConcurrentModificationException
    }
}

Read more on Map

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25  
Though old style, this will help avoid ConcurrentModificationExceptions over the new foreach style in the answers below. You can for instance remove via the seperate iterator. – Benjamin Wootton Dec 16 '10 at 9:22
317  
@karim79 what do you think about the following way: Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>(); for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : map.entrySet()) { System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue()); } – fresh_dev Oct 25 '11 at 8:56
14  
@vimukthi what do you mean a solution to that? Just remove the it.remove(); line. – Danny Jan 26 '12 at 19:07
66  
The for (Map.Entry<String, Object> cursor : map.entrySet()) {...} syntax is much better. – Chad Okere Jan 28 '12 at 17:29
10  
This API is not intuitive, so I google this answer repeatedly. – Alex Mar 28 '13 at 13:59

If you're only interested in the keys, you can iterate through the keySet() of the map:

Map<String, Object> map = ...;

for (String key : map.keySet()) {
    // ...
}

If you only need the values, use values():

for (Object value : map.values()) {
    // ...
}

Finally, if you want both the key and value, use entrySet():

for (Map.Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    String key = entry.getKey();
    Object value = entry.getValue();
    // ...
}

One caveat: if you want to remove items mid-iteration, you'll need to do so via an Iterator (see karim79's answer). However, changing item values is OK (see Map.Entry).

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1  
So how to do loop through 2 maps simultaneously? using the entrySet method? I tried using && but it ddnt work – DaMainBoss Jul 26 '11 at 18:18
    
Use two iterators. See the accepted answer for example usage of an iterator. – harto Jul 27 '11 at 4:08
8  
It's only more efficient to use entrySet when you need both keys and values. If you only need one or the other then just use that one: stackoverflow.com/questions/3870064/… – rogerdpack Oct 5 '11 at 23:14
3  
One more important point, the Set returned by keySet() and Collection returned by values() are both backed by the original Map. That is, if you make any modification in them they will be reflected back in the Map, however, both of them don't support add() and addAll() methods i.e. you can't add new key to the Set or new value in the Collection. – sactiw Jan 24 '14 at 8:27

Extracted from the reference How to Iterate Over a Map in Java:

There are several ways of iterating over a Map in Java. Let's go over the most common methods and review their advantages and disadvantages. Since all maps in Java implement the Map interface, the following techniques will work for any map implementation (HashMap, TreeMap, LinkedHashMap, Hashtable, etc.)

Method #1: Iterating over entries using a For-Each loop.

This is the most common method and is preferable in most cases. It should be used if you need both map keys and values in the loop.

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
for (Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());
}

Note that the For-Each loop was introduced in Java 5, so this method is working only in newer versions of the language. Also a For-Each loop will throw NullPointerException if you try to iterate over a map that is null, so before iterating you should always check for null references.

Method #2: Iterating over keys or values using a For-Each loop.

If you need only keys or values from the map, you can iterate over keySet or values instead of entrySet.

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

// Iterating over keys only
for (Integer key : map.keySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key = " + key);
}

// Iterating over values only
for (Integer value : map.values()) {
    System.out.println("Value = " + value);
}

This method gives a slight performance advantage over entrySet iteration (about 10% faster) and is more clean.

Method #3: Iterating using Iterator.

Using Generics:

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
Iterator<Map.Entry<Integer, Integer>> entries = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (entries.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry<Integer, Integer> entry = entries.next();
    System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());
}

Without Generics:

Map map = new HashMap();
Iterator entries = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (entries.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) entries.next();
    Integer key = (Integer)entry.getKey();
    Integer value = (Integer)entry.getValue();
    System.out.println("Key = " + key + ", Value = " + value);
}

You can also use same technique to iterate over keySet or values.

This method might look redundant, but it has its own advantages. First of all, it is the only way to iterate over a map in older versions of Java. The other important feature is that it is the only method that allows you to remove entries from the map during iteration by calling iterator.remove(). If you try to do this during For-Each iteration you will get "unpredictable results" according to Javadoc.

From a performance point of view this method is equal to a For-Each iteration.

Method #4: Iterating over keys and searching for values (inefficient).

Map<Integer, Integer> map = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
for (Integer key : map.keySet()) {
    Integer value = map.get(key);
    System.out.println("Key = " + key + ", Value = " + value);
}

This might look like a cleaner alternative for method #1, but in practice it is pretty slow and inefficient as getting values by a key might be time-consuming (this method in different Map implementations is 20%-200% slower than method #1). If you have FindBugs installed, it will detect this and warn you about inefficient iteration. This method should be avoided.

Conclusion:

If you need only keys or values from the map, use method #2. If you are stuck with older version of Java (less than 5) or planning to remove entries during iteration, you have to use method #3. Otherwise use method #1.

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Lets add the small caevet, that in case of ConcurrentMaps, iteration on keySet() will crash in general (there is no guarantee the values exist for earlier-gathered keys). On the other hand using iterators or entries is safe (they always refer to existing objects). – P Marecki Feb 29 at 12:34

You can iterate through the entries in a Map in several ways. Getting each key and value like this:

Map<?,?> map = new HashMap<Object, Object>();
for(Entry<?, ?> e: map.entrySet()){
	System.out.println("Key " + e.getKey());
	System.out.println("Value " + e.getValue());
}

Or you can get the list of keys with

Collection<?> keys = map.keySet();
for(Object key: keys){
    System.out.println("Key " + key);
    System.out.println("Value " + map.get(key));
}

If you just want to get all of the values, and aren't concerned with the keys, you can use:

Collection<?> values = map.values();
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Smarter:

for (String key : hashMap.keySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key: " + key + ", Value: " + map.get(key));
}
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8  
this actually depends on whether or not you need the keys. if not, it's more efficient to use entrySet() as hashCode() does not get called. – icfantv Oct 5 '11 at 22:33
11  
map.get(key) for every iteration is not smarter -- its way slower – ComputerEngineer88 Apr 18 '13 at 21:30
    
@ComputerEngineer88 Way slower compared to..? – Koray Tugay Apr 15 at 9:45
    
map.entrySet() which returns entries which already contains both the key and the value. This way you don't have to call hashCode() and search the hash during the iteration. – ComputerEngineer88 Apr 16 at 13:11
for (Map.Entry<String, String> item : params.entrySet()) {
  String key = item.getKey();
  String value = item.getValue();
}
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it would be good to add a line defining what params here is -although it's clear it must be a Map/HashMap – KNU Apr 5 '14 at 20:27

Depends. If you know you're going to need both the key and the value of every entry, then go through the entrySet. If you just need the values, then there's the values() method. And if you just need the keys, then use keyset().

A bad practice would be to iterate through all of the keys, and then within the loop, always do map.get(key) to get the value. If you're doing that, then the first option I wrote is for you.

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1  
One more important point, the Set returned by keySet() and Collection returned by values() are both backed by the original Map. That is, if you make any modification in them they will be reflected back in the Map, however, both of them don't support add() and addAll() methods i.e. you can't add new key to the Set or new value in the Collection. – sactiw Jan 24 '14 at 8:25

protected by Mohammad Adil Dec 3 '13 at 13:23

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