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I would like a strong typed integer in C++ that compiles in Visual Studio 2010.

I need this type to act like an integer in some templates. In particular I need to be able to:

StrongInt x0(1);                  //construct it.
auto x1 = new StrongInt[100000];  //construct it without initialization
auto x2 = new StrongInt[10]();    //construct it with initialization 

I have seen things like:

class StrongInt
{ 
    int value;
public: 
    explicit StrongInt(int v) : value(v) {} 
    operator int () const { return value; } 
}; 

or

class StrongInt
{ 
    int value;
public: 
    StrongInt() : value(0) {} //fails 'construct it without initialization
    //StrongInt() {} //fails 'construct it with initialization
    explicit StrongInt(int v) : value(v) {} 
    operator int () const { return value; } 
}; 

Since these things are not POD's, they do not quite work.

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Well, it needs a no-argument constructor for the array, and it needs an assignment operator to assign the actual value, and then that'd be about it. Am I missing something? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 19 '12 at 14:55
1  
@EitanT -- in C++11 they recycled the auto keyword to mean something new -- now it means "automatically deduce the type". It's kind of silly to use it here, but it's really handy for complex template type names that are hard to type. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 19 '12 at 15:00
2  
@EitanT: I do see the [visual-studio-2010] tag, and VC10 compiler does support new auto. –  Fanael May 19 '12 at 15:05
2  
@EitanT: In case you hadn't heard, this code is now standard-compliant. The C++11 tag isn't strictly necessary (and seems pointless, because the use or non-use of auto doesn't affect the question in any way). –  Ben Voigt May 19 '12 at 15:14
1  
@BenVoigt I haven't been updated on the "revamped" auto keyword, but in C++03 it doesn't compile, so I felt the necessity to tag it as C++11. But you're right about it being irrelevant to the question itself. –  Eitan T May 19 '12 at 15:24
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just use an enumeration type when I want a strongly-typed integer.

enum StrongInt { _min = 0, _max = INT_MAX };

StrongInt x0 = StrongInt(1);
int i = x0;
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2  
How is something that's implicitly convertible to any integer type strongly-typed? enum class might have made sense... –  ildjarn May 19 '12 at 19:07
1  
The OP's example were implicitly convertible to integers too, plus it meets the requirements for being easily (un)initialized. Enumeration types are not convertible to each other, so enum StrongInt and enum Price and enum Quantity are all distinct types that are not convertible to each other and can be used for overloading and specialization. Using enums as distinct integer types is a great technique, though I'm always surprised it's not more commonly used. –  Jonathan Wakely May 19 '12 at 22:16
    
@Jonathan I get a compiler error: StrongInt x0(1); =>error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'int' to 'StrongInt'. ---- However I can fix compile time errors by changing my code to StrongInt x0 = StrongInt(1), whereas I could not accept having hidden uninitialized or performance problems at runtime. So I am accepting this answer. –  jyoung May 20 '12 at 11:22
    
@ildjarn I had this tagged as VS-2010. That compiler does not support enum class. Someone had issues with my use of the keyword auto and incorrectly added the C++11 tag. –  jyoung May 20 '12 at 11:31
    
oops, yes, fixed that thanks –  Jonathan Wakely May 20 '12 at 13:40
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StrongInt x0(1);

Since these things are not POD's, they do not quite work.

These two things are incompatible: you can't have both constructor syntax and PODness. For a POD you'd need to use e.g. StrongInt x0 { 1 }; or StrongInt x0 = { 1 };, or even StrongInt x0({ 1 }); (that's a very round-about copy-initialization).

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