Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the WordNet lexical database in MySQL. I am looking to find synonyms of given words. Currently the data is set out in three tables as a many-to-many relationship:

words - (147,000 rows)
wordid, word

synsets - (119,000 rows)
synsetid

sense - (206,000 rows)
wordid, synsetid

All tables have indexes set up on them.

Each word can have several synsets and each synset can have several words. I am looking to return all words for all synsets for a given word. There tends to be around 2 synsets for each word (one for the verb usage, one for the noun) The SQL query I'm using for this is:

SELECT w.word
FROM sense s
INNER JOIN words w
ON s.wordid = w.wordid
WHERE s.synsetid 
IN
(
SELECT s.synsetid
FROM words w
INNER JOIN sense s
ON w.wordid = s.wordid 
WHERE w.word = "word_to_search"
)
AND w.word <> 'word_to_search' ORDER BY synsetid

This seems to be taking a very long time however (~0.75 secs). When you split the queries up they take ~0.0005 secs for the inner query and similar for each of the outer queries.

So what am I doing wrong? Is there a much more appropriate way to structure this query?

EDIT:

So the solution I have come up with after reading the linked articles below is:

SELECT w.word
FROM sense s
INNER JOIN words w
ON s.wordid = w.wordid
JOIN
(
SELECT s.synsetid
FROM words w
INNER JOIN sense s
ON w.wordid = s.wordid 
WHERE w.word = "word_to_search"
) i
ON i.synsetid = s.synsetid

This executes in ~0.0008 sec.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

avoiding IN and NOT IN (in your case just IN) with INNER JOIN ON could boost performance.

edit:

These links:

link 1

link 2

research the effectiveness of JOINS vs IN's and other interchangeable operations. They, however, conclude that IN and NOT IN does not need to be avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a JOIN risks duplication if the child table has more than one record relating to the parent –  OMG Ponies May 19 '12 at 15:32
    
@OMGPonies I'm no expert but that seems easy to avoid (using some non-inner join or smart where-clause) –  keyser May 19 '12 at 15:36
    
Thanks, this answers the 'what am I doing wrong' section. I was unaware that the DB does not work out the inner query first. I am still at a loss of how to better structure the query though. –  Jahnold May 19 '12 at 16:27
    
@Jahnold You might want to read this and this. They are not in favor of the JOIN. Sry if I'm confusing you :p (links suggested by michael buen) –  keyser May 19 '12 at 16:30
    
First article had the syntax I was looking for. Many thanks –  Jahnold May 19 '12 at 17:11

Perhaps this (Updated)

SELECT w2.word, synsetid
FROM words w
INNER JOIN synset s  on  s.wordId = w.wordID
INNER JOIN words2 w2 on w2.wordID = s.wordID
WHERE w.word = "word_to_search"
GROUP BY w2.word, synsetid
ORDER BY synsetid, w2.word

Now I think I understand what you want. All words within the same synset as the requested word.

share|improve this answer
    
This is throwing up an error: #1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'WHERE w.word = "word_to_search" GROUP BY w.word, synsetid ORDER BY synsetid, w.w' at line 5 It doesn't seem to like the 'and' –  Jahnold May 19 '12 at 16:07
    
removed the and it was an artifact of copy and paste and eliminating the sub select –  xQbert May 19 '12 at 16:12
    
Thanks, this just returns the 'word_to_search' and it's associated synsets though. It doesn't return all the other words in the synset. –  Jahnold May 19 '12 at 16:29
    
ah I failed to understand the premise. I've updated to account for what I know think you're after. after my edit however, if there are no other related words, nothing will be returned. I'd think you'd at least want the original word; but perhaps not. –  xQbert May 19 '12 at 16:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.