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I was playing around with a simple recursive formula and noticed that the code

p = 2.0

while p < 3.0:
    print p
    p = (6+p)**(0.5)

will print

*snip*
...
2.99999999952
2.99999999992
2.99999999999
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0

Of course there will be some kind of approximation between 2.99999999999 and 3.0 (and before that) but what is actually happening here? For me it seems odd that the floating point 3.0 will be interpreted as something not quite 3.0 but still close enough to be called 3.0, several times in a row.

Am I doing something wrong, code-wise, here or is my interpretation correct? I if so, why is this happening?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you change the print statement like so:

print '%.20f' % p

all will become clear:

2.00000000000000000000
2.82842712474619029095
2.97126692250060076006
2.99520732546189538681
2.99920111454065274614
2.99986684946859805123
2.99997780816268644344
2.99999630135816763854
2.99999938355963147174
2.99999989725993687628
2.99999998287665592400
2.99999999714610909862
2.99999999952435159045
2.99999999992072519106
2.99999999998678745783
2.99999999999779776161
2.99999999999963273822
2.99999999999993871569
2.99999999999998978595
2.99999999999999822364
2.99999999999999955591
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Ah, that makes a lot of sense. But why is it interpreted as 3.0 instead of 2.999...? I mean how is this approximation done, will it just chop the float after 11 decimal digits and call it 3.0 if all of them are 9? –  Max May 19 '12 at 17:13
    
@Max: Yes, it seems to be rounding to ~11 decimal digits. –  NPE May 19 '12 at 17:21
    
@Max: it will when the 12th decimal is >=5; that's how rounding works, after all. –  larsmans May 19 '12 at 17:22
    
@larsmans: That is an obvious explanation too, if I give it some thought. Case closed, thanks for explaining it to me. :) –  Max May 19 '12 at 17:30

This is due to the way print formats your float. Try printing with

print("%.40f" % p)
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