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I am a bit frustrated and confused by the OCaml Batteries Included concept and the way most tutorials I could find proceed. Before I get to use "productivity" tools like GODI or replace invocations of ocamlc with ocamlfind batteries/ocamlc (which is, at this point, too magical for me) I was hoping to be able to simply use OCaml Batteries Included core set of libraries like any other library. To that end I downloaded the latest source from git (head hash: 9f94ecb) and did a make all. I noticed that I got three .cma libraries at ./_build/src/ together with 102 .cmi files in the same directory. So I assumed that compiling with the -I switch pointing to that directory and linking with one of the three .cma libraries found there would be enough without needing to "install" the Batteries or use the platform tools. To test that, I set out to produce an executable for the following simple program I found somewhere:

(* file euler001.ml *)
open BatEnum      
open BatPervasives
let main () = 
 (1--999)
|> BatEnum.filter (fun i -> i mod 3 = 0 || i mod 5 == 0)
|> BatEnum.reduce (+) 
|> BatInt.print stdout

let _ = main ()

I was able to compile it with:

ocamlc -c -I ../batteries-included/_build/src/ euler001.ml

but when I tried to link with:

ocamlc -o euler001 unix.cma nums.cma ../batteries-included/_build/src/batteries.cma  euler001.cmo

I got:

File "_none_", line 1, characters 0-1:
Error: Error while linking ../batteries-included/_build/src/batteries.cma(BatBigarray):
The external function `caml_ba_reshape' is not available

The nums.cma and unix.cma I added at the command line because the linker complained about missing references to undefined global Big_int and (when that was added) to Unix. But after these two modules were added on the linker invocation I received the last message (on the missing external function 'caml_ba_reshape') which proved blocking for me. So I would like to ask:

  1. how does one proceed in this particular case?
  2. how does one proceed in the general case (i.e. when the linker complains about a missing external function)
  3. is it viable to use Batteries Included in this fashion? Before I rely on platform tools I want to have the assurance that I can use the underlying artifacts (cma and cmi/mli files) with the standard OCaml compiler and linker if I run into problems.
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1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

caml_ba_reshape is, as you could guess from the name but I agree it's not obvious, a primitive of the Bigarray module. You should add bigarray.cma in your compilation command, before batteries.cma which depends on it.

There is a reason why it is advised to use ocamlfind, which is precisely used to abstract over those dependencies. I don't think you are supposed to use ocamlfind batteries/ocamlc, but rather ocamlfind ocamlc -package batteries. If you insist on using the compiler without such support, then indeed you have to compile manually -- I understand your frustration, but I hope you also understand that it is intrisic to any sufficiently sophisticated OCaml library, and that it comes only from your self-imposed constraints.

how does one proceed in the general case (i.e. when the linker complains about a missing external function

You have to know or guess where the primitive comes from. Looking at the META file provided by the library, which is used to inform ocamlfind of the dependencies, may help you. You can use the tool ocamlobjinfo to know which primitive a .cma provides, if you want to check your assumption. (Or better, use ocamlfind to spit the correct compile command, see below.)

is it viable to use Batteries Included in this fashion?

Compiling "by hand" is reasonable if you insist. Working only in the source repository, without installing the library, is not. It's easy to keep doing what you do after an install, just replace your -I ... by the chosen install path.

Before I rely on platform tools I want to have the assurance that I can use the underlying artifacts (cma and cmi/mli files) with the standard OCaml compiler and linker if I run into problems.

ocamlfind is not (only) a platform tool. It is the way to use third-party ocaml libraries, period. It should be a standard on any ocaml-using platform. That it does not come with INRIA's distribution is an historical detail.

You can ask ocamlfind to show you its invocation of the bare compilers:

% ocamlfind ocamlc -linkpkg -package batteries t.ml -o test -verbose
Effective set of compiler predicates:
pkg_unix,pkg_num.core,pkg_num,pkg_bigarray,pkg_str,pkg_batteries,autolink,byte
+ ocamlc.opt -o test -verbose -I /usr/local/lib/ocaml/3.12.1/batteries /usr/lib/ocaml/unix.cma /usr/lib/ocaml/nums.cma /usr/lib/ocaml/bigarray.cma /usr/lib/ocaml/str.cma /usr/local/lib/ocaml/3.12.1/batteries/batteries.cma t.ml

I don't want to throw stones at you. The landscape of OCaml tools, beside the minimal nutshell of what's provided by the source distribution, is quite sparse and lack a coherent point of entry. With time I've grown used to those tools and it's quite natural to use them, but I understand there is some cost of entry that we should try to lower.

PS: any advice on how to improve batteries documentation is warmly welcome. Patches to add things to the documentation or fix it are even better. batteries-devel@lists.forge.ocamlcore.org is the place to go.

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