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Every textbook I've ever seen on recursive functions uses the factorials as an example, which is helpful but not totally illuminating.

For programming purposes, can a recursive function take a function as its base case, can it include other function calls within its body, or can it execute differently at different levels of recursion?

And if it does these any of these things, is it still a 'recursive function' or is it now something else?

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1  
A recursive function is nothing more than a function that calls itself. That's it. What do you mean by "takes a function as its base case?" –  Matt Ball May 19 '12 at 17:59
    
I guess, for example, you'd have a function that took some inputs and transformed them somehow into outputs. Then you'd have a second function that called the first and modified its output, Then calls itself on its own output, maybe with a case switch statement or something so different behavior with different inputs, something like that? Really new in this territority and just trying to feel around. –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 18:00
1  
Interesting question! Regarding part 2, "can it include other function calls," the answer is definitely yes: for example, you can even call another recursive function that calls your first function, which is known as mutual recursion. –  bnaul May 19 '12 at 18:00
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See the answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/10667598/…. –  bmargulies May 19 '12 at 18:06
    
Good link, thanks –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a fairly straightforward example of a recursive function that simply outputs all of the values in a collection, an array represented as a stack, to the browser console as it pops them off of the stack using the .pop() method.

The totalSize value doesn't change throughout the entire call stack so that it can be used to measure the halfway point by dividing the current stack size by the original size.

To answer the question of can it behave differently at different levels in the recursion, the answer is yes:

// a simple array of 10 items
var coll = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10];

// recursive function that calls itself. It behaves slightly different at
 // the halfway point
function test(totalSize, col) {
    if(col == undefined || col.length == 0) {
        return 0;

     } else {
        if(col.length / totalSize < .5) {
            console.log("Past 1/2 way point!");
        }
        console.log("total = " + totalSize);
        console.log("col.pop() = " + col.pop());
        return test(totalSize, col);
    }
}

// make a call to the function with the total size and the collection
test(coll.length, coll);

Additionally, you also asked if it were possible to call other functions, this is also possible. In the example below, a function is used to return the result of the base case, and a function is used to abstract the halfway point behavior:

// a simple array of 10 items
var coll = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10];

// recursive function that calls itself. It behaves slightly different at
 // the halfway point
function test(totalSize, col) {
    if(col == undefined || col.length == 0) {
        return handleBaseCase(totalSize, col);

     } else {
        // handle if it's at 1/2 way point
        handleHalfwayPoint(totalSize, col);  

        console.log("tital = " + totalSize);
        console.log("col.pop() = " + col.pop());
        return test(totalSize, col);
    }
}

function handleHalfwayPoint(totalSize, collection) {
    if(collection.length / totalSize < .5) {
        console.log("Past 1/2 way point!");
    }
}

// instead of returning 0, return "Done" and also print to the log
function handleBaseCase(totalSize, collection) {
    console.info("Done!");
    return "Done!";
}

// make a call to the function with the total size and the collection
test(coll.length, coll);

While these particular examples don't solve any real-world problem, it demonstrates how the concept of calling a function inside another function could expand to handle other use-cases. The examples in your textbook are simply designed to teach you the basics of recursion and help arm you with the tools necessary to take on more complex, real-world problems in the future.

Since this functional language is JavaScript, the barriers to running them are low. You can try these examples by running the code in the Chrome Developer Console, or you could run them in a small test HTML file. Good luck!

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Massively great answer, thanks. –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 18:32
    
I'm happy to help! :) –  jmort253 May 19 '12 at 18:35
    
I don't suppose you could recommend any resources to get further into recursive programming? I've read that iterative and recursive functions are supposed to be translatable into each other, trying to get a better feel for what that means. Like, any books or online stuff would be a huge help. If not, thanks a ton anyway, would vote you up twice if i could. –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 19:12
    
If you think about it, recursion is just simply another looping strategy, like a for or while loop. For instance, you could think of the body of a while loop as being a function that is called repeatedly, as long as the condition in that while loop continues to be true. As for resources on recursion, my suggestion is to Google it. Google your language of choice and recursion, and Google translating recursive functions to for/while loops. You'll get much better results that way IMHO. Good luck! :) –  jmort253 May 19 '12 at 19:17
    
Hey man,Thanks again. –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 19:33

The definition of a recursive function is simply "a function that calls itself". So if you have a function that calls itself, it is a recursive function.

Anything else simply depends on the capabilities of the language you're working with.

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A recursive function is a function that calls itself one or more times in its body. Functions can also be mutually recursive, where one function is defined in terms of the second, or vice-versa.

I've been programming for over 20 years without the need for recursion. What made me really understand the need, as well as the beauty, of recursive calls was the Scheme language, and books such as "The little Schemer".

Not all programming languages support recursion at the same level. Scheme is one of those who do it very well. Python much less so. So if you want to dive into recursion, check the abilities of your programming language.

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3  
"I've been programming for over 20 years without the need for recursion." So you've never written a recursive-descent parser, or used a tree data structure, or used quicksort/binary search/mergesort, or the Euclidean algorthim? –  Matt Ball May 19 '12 at 18:20
    
I looked up 'recursive descent parser' on wikipedia, I think something like this is what motivated my question. I'm reading 'Little Schemer', but I have trouble finding good resources on recursion, like practical examples of its use. Can you recommend any resources (online, books, whatever)? –  user173361 May 19 '12 at 18:27
    
@Matt Ball: Indeed. I used to write programs for a bank. You don't need that stuff to write a security back-office system, for example. I'd even say that it's actually frowned upon in most places, because the guy who will have to maintain your code will not be able to make any sense of it. –  Le Petit Prince May 19 '12 at 21:08

As other answers have said, a recursive function is a function that calls itself. There are two types as explained here:

  1. Direct recursion: in which the function calls itself.
  2. Indirect recursion: when a function is called not by itself but by another function that it called (either directly or indirectly).

I see the math tag in your question. Recursion is related to math induction. If you prove that it can solve the base case and then you prove that if any one statement in the infinite sequence of statements is true, then so is the next one, you prove that it will solve the problem in any case.

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