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This question aims to understand Objective-C's manual memory management currently, and its use in the past.

It is said that people who worked with Objective-C for many years almost treat memory management in Objective-C like a "reflex"... (the alloc, retain, release, autorelease)

But isn't it true that if Objective-C is used on a computer, then there is garbage collection? Isn't it true that manual management in Objective-C isn't needed until the recent use of it on iPhone and iPad because iOS has no garbage collection? How about in the past, maybe back in the 90s, when Objective-C has no garbage collection, or does it always have garbage collection but since the iPhone came out, then the retain and release were added to the language?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To answer the question you actually asked, Objective-C only gained garbage collection with the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard in (late) 2007. Prior to that, manual memory management was the only option. Even after the release of Leopard, most Cocoa developers didn't use garbage collection for various reasons: inertia of existing codebases, need to support older OS versions, performance penalties inherent in using garbage collection, not supported on iOS, etc.

ARC has been adopted more quickly for several reasons, and I (and obviously Apple) think it's a much better solution than garbage collection. ARC was made available with the release of iOS 5.0 and Mac OS X 10.7 Lion (with partial support for deploying to iOS 4.3 and Mac OS X 10.6). Lion and iOS 5 were both released less than a year ago, so any developers who have been writing Objective-C longer than that use/used manual reference counting, and you're correct that it's reflexive for most of us.

While ARC has been adopted quickly, at least compared to garbage collection, its use is still far from universal. Anyone needing to support iOS 4.2 or earlier or Mac OS X 10.5 or earlier still absolutely has to use manual reference counting. Also, I think there are a lot of seasoned Cocoa programmers who simply haven't seen a reason to switch to ARC yet, since for them, manual reference counting isn't a huge burden.

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does it feel good to work with Objective-C? I came from a C background and feel a bit strange at the fuzziness of Javascript... and when I program in Objective-C, I felt it is back to the certainty feeling I had which made me go into computer science in the first place –  動靜能量 May 19 '12 at 18:24
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I started with C as well, and found learning Objective-C relatively straightforward. Objective-C is the language I'm most comfortable in, by far, which colors my judgement I think, but I do enjoy working with it very much. I rarely, if ever, encounter situations where I'm unsure how some (small) piece of code is going to behave without looking it up. –  Andrew Madsen May 19 '12 at 18:27

But isn't it true that if Objective-C is used on a computer, then there is garbage collection?

Garbage collection is, first of all, a new-ish feature as far as ObjC goes, introduced at the same time as OS X 10.5, in 2007. Second, it's a framework feature -- that is, it's part of Cocoa -- not part of the language itself. It's still available on OS X, but as far as I know Apple doesn't really intend it to be used anymore. ARC is the new system-supplied memory management paradigm.

Isn't it true that manual management in Objective-C isn't needed until the recent use of it on iPhone and iPad because iOS has no garbage collection? How about in the past, maybe back in the 90s, when Objective-C has no garbage collection, or does it always have garbage collection but since the iPhone came out,

No, manual memory management was always necessary on the desktop (just as it is in C++ or C), from the NeXT days onwards, until the introduction of Cocoa's garbage collection. Even after having GC available, many people preferred to stick with MRR due to performance concerns or the need to run on older OS versions.

then the retain and release were added to the language?

The specific methods retain and release, and the reference counting system that they enable are, again, part of the framework, not the language, but since Cocoa is the pre-eminent framework that uses ObjC (other ObjC frameworks, like GNUStep, imitate Cocoa), it's the main way that memory management is performed when writing ObjC. (Cocoa inherited the retain/release system from NeXT, of course.)

It's entirely possible to write another root class with its own memory management methods/system. Doing so and trying to interact with Cocoa would be a little crazy, though, and it wouldn't be compileable with ARC at all.

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Manual memory management (or ARC, which tells the compiler to try and do some of the manual memory management for you) allows more deterministic run time performance, and better control over an app's peak memory usage, both extremely important on small mobile devices. Why waste the users battery life doing garbage collection, often at the worse times for good animation and UI responsiveness?

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