Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning Qt and I was reading about Threads, Events and QObjects from Qt wiki, and followed the wiki recommendations on how to handle some work in a while condition but its not working for my specific case. Here's a simple example of what I'm currently trying to achieve.

class FooEvents : public FooWrapper {

    public virtual serverTime(..) { std::cout << "Server time event\n"; }
    public virtual connected(..) { std::cout << "Connected event\n"; }
}

class Foo : public QObject {

private:

    FooAPI *client;

public:


    Foo(FooEvents *ev, QObject *parent = 0) : client(new FooApi(ev)) { .. }

private slots:
    void processMessages() {

        if (state is IDLE)              

            reqFooAPiServerTime();

        select(client->fd()+1, ...);

        if (socket is ready for read)

            client.onReceive();

    }
public:
    void connect(...) {

        if (connection) {

            QObject::connect(&timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(processMessages()));
            timer.start(1000);  // I don't get the output from FooEvents

        }

    }

}

This is a very simple but I think it illustrates my case. Why is this not working and what other alternatives to I have to handle this case? Thanks.s

Edit: The processMessages is being called every second but I don't get any output from the events

share|improve this question
    
We don't understand "what is not working" unless you specify it! –  spyke May 19 '12 at 18:20
    
I can't see how processMessages() relates to the events (FooEvents?) –  Frank Osterfeld May 19 '12 at 18:51
    
@FrankOsterfeld . Its part of API I'm using. I have to implement all the events the API provides and when I call an API method it fires the corresponding event through the FooWrapper. –  sectorzz9 May 19 '12 at 18:59
    
@sectorzz9: so you've edited the question to say that processMessage() is getting called every second. In that case, there's clearly no problem with the timer. You need to ask a question about your real problem of not getting "any output from the events". There no information here about what output you are expecting, and the question's title has nothing to do with your actual problem (since the method is executing every second). –  Michael Burr May 19 '12 at 20:41
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Where is timer declared and defined?

If it's local to Foo::connect() it'll be destroyed before it ever has a chance to fire. Presumably it just needs to be a member object of the Foo class.

Also keep in mind that QObject provides it's own simple interface to a timer - just override the protected virtual timerEvent() function and call QObject's startTimer() to start getting those timer events. In this case instead of having a slot to receive the timer events, they will just end up at the overridden timerEvent() function:

protected:
    void timerEvent(QTimerEvent *event) {
        processMessages();
    }

public:
    void connect( /* ... */ ) {

            // ... 

            startTimer(1000);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This helped me solve the problem. –  sectorzz9 May 20 '12 at 16:00
    
Although the solution is correct I wouldn't recommend to override timerEvent(). Use QTimer instead, it will make the code much cleaner and it's a dedicated interface for timer related actions (ex: setting it's parameters and to control it). –  Viktor Benei May 22 '12 at 19:06
    
Viktor: QTimer has an overhead of an extra QObject with it, and also an extra signal-slot connection. Apart from the obvious memory overhead, the direct (non-queued) signal-slot connection overhead is equivalent on my machine to concatenating two 1000 character QStrings together, so it's hardly trivial. Using a QBasicTimer as a placeholder for timerId and active state of the timer is a decent optimization IMHO. I personally use QTimer only for single-shot, rarely firing convenience use. Anything periodic goes via QBasicTimer and is processed in QObject::timerEvent(). –  Kuba Ober Jun 1 '12 at 6:19
add comment

This won't work, because processMessages() is not a SLOT.

 So Declare processMessages() as a private slot and then try.
share|improve this answer
    
Its defined as a slot. I forgot to put it in the example. –  sectorzz9 May 19 '12 at 18:32
    
Then check whether it is getting inside if(connection) block!. –  spyke May 19 '12 at 18:46
    
It is.I said that in my Edit message. ProcessMessages is being called every second but the events are not getting fired. It works if I call processMessages directly. –  sectorzz9 May 19 '12 at 18:49
add comment

You don't declare the timer neither the slot. In the header you must declare:

class ... {

  QTimer timer;
  ...
private slots:
  void processMessages();
  ...
};

Then remember to make the SIGNAL-SLOT connection and configure the timer:

connect(&timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(processMessages()));
timer.setInterval(1000);
timer.start();

Also timer.start(1000); would be valid...

ANOTHER POSSIBILITY

Other possibility would be to use the timer associated with each Q_OBJECT and overload the timerEvent:

class ... {
  Q_OBJECT
  ...
protected:
  void timerEvent(QTimerEvent *event);
  ...
};

Then you must implement the timer event as this:

void MyClass::timerEvent(QTimerEvent *event) {
  processMessages();
}

And you can configure the timer with a simple call to startTimer(1000);

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.