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I have several lines of text, like this

text1*textX*,text2

and I would like to move the text between the ** markers to the start of the line, so it looks like this

textX "text1" "text2"

How can I do that in the command line?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While Niraj Nawanit's answer might give you what you're looking for, this gives you exactly what you asked for:

%s/\([^*]*\)\*\(.*\)\*,\([^[:space:]]*\)/\2 "\1" "\3"/
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Try below command:

s/^\(.*\)\*\(.*\)\*/\2 \1/

It modifies text1*textX*,text2 to textX text1,text2

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if has literals * you need put them inside [*]

:%s,\v^([^ ]*)\s\+([^ ]*).*,\2 \1,g

: ................. command
% ................. whole file
s ................. replace
^ ................. begining of line
, ................. search and replace delimiter (comma exchanging by bar)
\v ................ very magic, see :h very-magic
([^ ]*) ........... group 1 (group here) everything except space
\s\+ .............. one or more spaces
([^ ]*) ........... group 2 (group here) everything except space
\s\+ .............. one or more spaces
.* ................ zero or more characters

\2 ................. back reference to group 2
\1 ................. back reference to group 1
, .................. ending replace
g .................. global 
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this is awesome, thanks –  Jose187 May 20 '12 at 6:13

Another approach...

On the above sample I would do (in normal mode):

0dt*f*p

. 0     :    goes to start of line
. d     :    starts delete (waits for movement or text object)
. t*    :    moves the cursor to the first asterisk and yanks the deleted text to the unnamed register
. f*    :    moves the cursor to the second asterisk
. p     :    pastes the contents of the unnamed register immediately after the second asterisk

References:

:h f
:h t

Naturally, it does take a bit of practice before you're able to conjure up the power of these two commands and they becomes second nature so you can use them in real world situations.

I sometimes find this approach more effective than typing a regex on Vim's command line.

More than a couple of lines:

qzq:@=n 

Where n is the repetition factor.

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