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After some remarks from my previous post , I made the following modifications :

int main()
{
char errorStr[BUFF3];
 while (1)
 {

     int i , errorFile;

     char *line = malloc(BUFFER);
     char *origLine = line;
     fgets(line, 128, stdin);   // get a line from stdin

     // get complete diagnostics on the given string
     lineData info = runDiagnostics(line);

     char command[20];
     sscanf(line, "%20s ", command);
     line = strchr(line, ' ');          // here I remove the command from the line , the command is stored in "commmand" above

     printf("The Command is: %s\n", command);

     int currentCount = 0;                  // number of elements in the line
     int *argumentsCount = &currentCount;   // pointer to that

     // get the elements separated
     char** arguments = separateLineGetElements(line,argumentsCount);

     printf("\nOutput after separating the given line from the user\n");
     for (i = 0; i < *argumentsCount; i++) {
         printf("Argument %i is: %s\n", i, arguments[i]);
     }

     // here we call a method that would execute the commands
     pid_t pid ;

     if (-1 == (pid = fork()))
     {
        sprintf(errorStr,"fork: %s\n",strerror(errno));
        write(errorFile,errorStr,strlen(errorStr + 1));
        perror("fork");
        exit(1);
     }
     else if (pid == 0)  // fork was successful
     {
        printf("\nIn son process\n");

        // if (execvp(arguments[0],arguments)  < 0)       // for the moment I ignore this line
        if (execvp(command,arguments)  < 0)       // execute the command
        {
            perror("execvp");
            printf("ERROR: execvp failed\n");
            exit(1);
        }
     }
     else // parent
     {
        int status = 0;
        pid = wait(&status);
        printf("Process %d returned with status %d.", pid, status);
     }

     // print each element of the line
     for (i = 0; i < *argumentsCount; i++) {
         printf("Argument %i is: %s\n", i, arguments[i]);
     }

     // free all the elements from the memory
     for (i = 0; i < *argumentsCount; i++) {
         free(arguments[i]);
     }

     free(arguments);
     free(origLine);
 }

 return 0;
}

When I enter in the Console : ls > out.txt

I get :

The Command is: ls
execvp: No such file or directory
In son process
ERROR: execvp failed
Process 4047 returned with status 256.Argument 0 is: >
Argument 1 is: out.txt

So I guess that the son process is active , but from some reason the execvp fails .

Why ?

Regards

REMARK :

The ls command is just an example . I need to make this works with any given command .

EDIT 1 :

User input : ls > qq.out Program output :

The Command is: ls

Output after separating the given line from the user
Argument 0 is: >
Argument 1 is: qq.out

In son process
>: cannot access qq.out: No such file or directory
Process 4885 returned with status 512.Argument 0 is: >
Argument 1 is: qq.out
share|improve this question
2  
I explained in my answer to your previous question that you can't just pass > as an argument to ls. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 20:22
3  
It's more complicated than that; you need to redirect stdout for your child process. See e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/5517913/…. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 19 '12 at 20:34
2  
You should show the debug loop that prints the values in the 'array' arguments, so we can see what your separateLineGetElements() function has done. Your char * const newArg[] = { arguments, NULL }; line is incorrect; your compiler should be giving you warnings about the - heed them! The argumentsCount variable is superfluous; you could pass &currentCount to your function. For an input line of only 128 bytes, it is modestly silly to use malloc() when you could simply write char line[128]; (or, better, char line[4096];) instead. –  Jonathan Leffler May 19 '12 at 20:39
2  
You're confused about numerous things, one of which is that ls > out.txt means "list the files whose names are > and out.txt". The > argument has no special meaning to >. It is shell syntax. but you are not running the shell; you're trying to run the ls program. ls > out.txt can only work if you either pipe that into a shell process as input, or pass it to a shell as the -c argument. I.e. the argument vector "/bin/sh" "-c" "ls > out.txt". –  Kaz May 19 '12 at 22:17
1  
Another issue is that argv[0] is not the first argument. The first argument is argv[1]. argv[0] is supposed to be the program name. –  Kaz May 19 '12 at 22:21

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