Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Okay, here is what i would like to do.

Class Container<T>
{
    T contained;
    public void ContainObject(T obj)
    {
        contained = obj;
        if(/*Magical Code That Detects If T Implemtns IContainableObject*/)
        {
            IContainableObect c = (IContainableObject)obj;
            c.NotifyContained(self);
        }
    }
}

interface IContainableObject
{
    public void NotifyContained(Container<REPLACE_THIS>);//This line is important, see below after reading code.
}



Class ImplementingType : IContaiableObject
{
    public Container<ImplementingType> MyContainer;
    public void NotifyContained(Container<ImplmentingType> c)
    {
        MyContainer = c;
    }
}




Class Main
{
    public static void Main(args)
    {
        ImplementingType iObj = new ImplementingType();
        Container<ImplementingType> container = new Container();
        container.ContainObject(iObj);
        //iObj.MyContainer should now be pointing to container.
    }
}

Basically, to sum up the above example, I have a generic wrapper type of type T. I would like that wrapper type to notify whatever it contains that it is being contained (with a copy of its self!) IF the contained object implements a specific interface (this bit I know how to do)

But it gets tricky! Why? Well because the container generic needs to have a type.

Remember that important line?

If REPLACE_THIS is IContainableObject, then all implementers of the interface must use IContainerObject, not the name of the implementing class in their NotifyContained method.

Using ImplementingType as the type of the container within the interface is even worse, for obvious reasons!

So my question is, what do I do to make REPLACE_THIS represent the class of the object implementing the interface?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
class Container<T>
{
    T contained;
    public void ContainObject(T obj)
    {
        contained = obj;
        var containable = obj as IContainableObject<T>;
        if(containable != null)
        {
            containable.NotifyContained(this);
        }
    }
}

interface IContainableObject<T>
{
    void NotifyContained(Container<T> c);
}

class ImplementingType : IContainableObject<ImplementingType>
{
    public Container<ImplementingType> MyContainer;
    public void NotifyContained(Container<ImplementingType> c)
    {
        MyContainer = c;
    }
}

EDIT: add version with generic constraint

interface IContainer<T>
{
    void ContainObject(T obj);
}

class Container<T> : IContainer<T> where T : IContainableObject<T>
{
    T contained;

    public void ContainObject(T obj)
    {
        contained = obj;
        contained.NotifyContained(this);
    }
}

interface IContainableObject<T>
{
    void NotifyContained(IContainer<T> c);
}

class ImplementingType : IContainableObject<ImplementingType>
{
    public IContainer<ImplementingType> MyContainer;

    public void NotifyContained(IContainer<ImplementingType> c)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("notify contained");
        MyContainer = c;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Works like a charm :) –  Georges Oates Larsen May 19 '12 at 20:40
1  
You can avoid the casting if you declare a generic constraint for T. –  Morten Mertner May 19 '12 at 20:42
    
Oops I just noticed a typo in my example code after noticing you created an empty interface for IContainerObject -- I Accidentally typed IContainer not IContainable. Does this mean your IContainer interface can simply be removed? –  Georges Oates Larsen May 19 '12 at 20:46
    
Also, interesting about the casting! Thankyou :) –  Georges Oates Larsen May 19 '12 at 20:49
    
Yes, updated code. –  Phil May 19 '12 at 20:53

Maybe you know it already, but if only IContainableObjects are allowed as T you can declare your class like this

class Container<T> 
    where T : IContainableObject
{
    public void ContainObject(T obj)
    {
        // Here you know that obj does always implement IContainableObject.
        obj.NotifyContained(this);   
    }

    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting solution! IContainableObject is an optional interface -- Only for those who want it, so this is not a viable option for me, but in any other case, looks like it would work :) –  Georges Oates Larsen May 19 '12 at 20:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.