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Good day everybody, I'm beginner on C++. The aim I want to achieve is quiet silly. But I don't see/understand where is the mistake. I will be very thankfull with any bluecode help.

So... I want to assign the content of the file "REL", which is a matrix of 46x2 [no blank lines]:

28 28
28  6
28 21
28 30
28 16
22 22
22 33
22 9
39 39
39 32
39 46
39 10
39 24
36 36
36 7
36 43
36 23
11 11
11 26
11 41
15 15
15 17
15 45
15 29
15 40
3 3
3 37
3 42
3 34
3 2
35 35
35 4
35 14
35 44
35 18
13 13
13 12
13 25
13 5
13 1
13 8
13 31
20 20
20 27
20 19
20 38

and my C++ code is:

    include <stdlib.h>
    include <malloc.h>
    include <iostream>
    include <fstream>

    using namespace std;

    void allocateMatrix(int **& A, int row, int col)
    {
        int i;
        A = new int*[row];
        for (i=1; i<=col; i++)
            A[i] = new int[col];
    }

    void ReadData(int **& A, int row, int col) // read data from file
    {  
    int i,j;
    ifstream REL1;
    REL1.open ("REL");  // open file for reading                
    for(i=1;i<=row;i++)   // row loop
    {
        for(j=1;j<=col;j++)  // column loop
        {
            REL1 >> A[i][j]; // read data into matrix
        }
        REL1.close(); // close the file                
    }
    }

    void Display(int **& A, int row, int col) // display matrix
    { 
    int i,j;
    for(i=1;i<=row;i++)
    {
        for(j=1;j<=col;j++)
        { 
            cout << A[i][j] << "\t ";  // display numbers
        }
        cout << endl;
    }    
    }

    void Cero(int **& A, int row, int col) // display matrix
    {
    int i,j;
    for(i=1;i<=row;i++)
    {
        for(j=1;j<=col;j++)
        {
            A[i][j]=0;
        }
    }   
    }   

    int main()
    {
    int tm,rowR,colR,rowM,colM,**A,**B; 

    ifstream TM;
    TM.open("TM");
    TM >> tm;
    TM.close();

    rowR = rowM = colM = tm;
    colR = 2;

    allocateMatrix(A, rowM, colM);
    allocateMatrix(B, rowR, colR);
    Cero(A, rowM, colM); 
    //Display(A, rowM, colM);
    ReadData(B ,rowR, colR);
    Display(B, rowR, colR);

    }

and... when I run it in bash, the shell prompted to me:

28   28  
0    0   
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

Thanks in advance!!!

share|improve this question
1  
Unguarded input (like you >>) is a serious error. Had you checked its return value, you would have noticed that you're closing the file object far too often. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 0:18
    
Thanks Kerrek SB, but I cannot realize "Unguarded input (like you >>) " –  Alejandro May 20 '12 at 1:31
    
You mustn't just say REL1 >> A[i][j];, because that discards the vitally important return value of the operation. Instead, you need something like if (!(REL1 >> A[i][j])) { std::cerr << "Fatal error!\n"; std::exit(1); }. –  Kerrek SB May 20 '12 at 9:56
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
for(i=1;i<=row;i++)   // row loop
{
    for(j=1;j<=col;j++)  // column loop
    {
        REL1 >> A[i][j]; // read data into matrix
    }
    REL1.close(); // close the file                
}

You're closing the file after reading the first line. Move the file closing line out of the loop.

for(i=1;i<=row;i++)   // row loop
{
    for(j=1;j<=col;j++)  // column loop
    {
        REL1 >> A[i][j]; // read data into matrix
    }               
}
REL1.close(); // close the file 
share|improve this answer
    
Thnaks for the reply and I tested aswell, but the result is not encoraging... in shell it prompeted to me " ~/CM$ ./m2 Segmentation fault (core dumped) " –  Alejandro May 20 '12 at 1:30
    
I'm not a master in C++, can you try to run the outer for loop to 10 or another number instead of "row", and watch the results? I think the problem's coming out from boundaries. –  Ismet Alkan May 20 '12 at 1:34
    
Thanks Ismet Alkan, and you are partially correct. I followed your advice and it display me more values. I tried with row = 10 and after row = 100 and it worked partially... the shell prompted to me **28 28 28 6 28 21 28 30 28 16 22 22 22 33 22 9 39 39 39 32 39 46 39 10 39 24 36 36 36 7 36 43 36 23 11 11 11 26 11 41 15 15 15 17 15 45 ** But... the list is the half and is not organize like a matrix [46*2] It seems that the data from file is not assigned by having in mind the matrix... just and array of one row –  Alejandro May 20 '12 at 1:49
add comment

Thanks @KerrekSB for your response. This level of C++ programming is quiet one step ahead of basic knowledge of C++. Nevertheless, I tried your suggestion and rewrite the code as is posted:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <malloc.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>  // for istream_iterator
#include <string>    // for getline and string
#include <vector>    // for vector
#include <cstdlib>   // for exit

using namespace std;

namespace
{
    void die(int code, char const * msg)
    {
        std::cerr << msg << std::endl;
    std::exit(code);
    }
}

void AllocateMatrix(int **& A, int row, int col)
{
int i;
A = new int*[row];
for (i=0; i<col; i++)
    A[i] = new int[col];
}

void ReadData(int **& A, int row, int col) // read data from file
{  
int i,j,in;
ifstream REL1;
REL1.open ("REL");  // open file for reading                
for(i=0;i<row;i++)   // row loop
{
    REL1 >> in; // read data into matrix
    for(j=0;j<col;j++)  // column loop
    {
        A[i][j]=in;
    }
}
REL1.close(); // close the file                
}

void Display(int **& A, int row, int col) // display matrix
{ 
int i,j;
for(i=0;i<row;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<col;j++)
    { 
        cout << A[i][j] << "\t ";  // display numbers
    }
}
cout <<endl;    
}

void Cero(int **& A, int row, int col) // display matrix
{
int i,j;
for(i=0;i<row;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<col;j++)
    {
        A[i][j]=0;
    }
}   
}   

int main()
{
int tm,rowR,colR,rowM,colM,**A,**B; 

ifstream TM;
TM.open("TM");
TM >> tm;
TM.close();

rowR = 46; 
rowM = colM = tm;
colR = 2;

AllocateMatrix(A, rowM, colM);
AllocateMatrix(B, rowR, colR);
Cero(A, rowM, colM); 
//Display(A, rowM, colM);
//ReadData(B ,rowR, colR);


std::ifstream rel("REL");
if (!rel) { die(1, "Could not open file."); }
std::vector<std::vector<int> > matrix;
for (std::string line; std::getline(rel, line); )
{
    std::istringstream iss(line);
    std::vector<int> row(2);
    if (!(iss >> row[0] >> row[1])) { die(1, "Invalid line!"); }
    matrix.push_back(row);
}




Display(B, rowR, colR);
}

And when I execute it, it prompet :

Invalid line!
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a typical, robust, albeit not perfectly optimal general method for reading input: Read each line first, and then parse each line into tokens. Length checking can be added of course so that you don't attempt to read a file with billions of lines, but I leave that to you.

Note that we never explicitly call close(), since that's not needed.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>  // for istream_iterator
#include <string>    // for getline and string
#include <vector>    // for vector
#include <cstdlib>   // for exit

namespace
{
    void die(int code, char const * msg)
    {
        std::cerr << msg << std::endl;
        std::exit(code);
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::ifstream tm("TM.txt");

    if (!tm) { die(1, "Could not open file."); }

    std::vector<std::vector<int>> matrix;

    for (std::string line; std::getline(tm, line); )
    {
        std::istringstream iss(line);
        std::vector<int> row(2);

        if (!(iss >> row[0] >> row[1])) { die(1, "Invalid line!"); }

        matrix.push_back(row);
    }

    // done, now use matrix[i][j]
}

In C++11 you could add various small optimisations, but never mind about that now. In a more general setting, you could also remove the restriction that each row consist of only two elements and instead read as many as there are, possibly checking the final size:

std::vector<int> row(std::istream_iterator<int>(iss), std::istream_iterator<int>());
// check that row.size() has the desired value!

Finally, you might like to add a counter to the outer loop and abort if there are more lines than expected (e.g. 46 in your case), so that you can't be sabotaged by a huge input file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Array indices start at 0, not 1.

share|improve this answer
    
... and also the test in the for loop should use <, not <= –  Jeremy Friesner May 20 '12 at 0:47
    
ok... I tested your suggestion and I still get " ~/CM$ ./m2 Segmentation fault (core dumped) " Thanks But I cannot still figure out the misplaced command... another different point of view to assume this properly? again Thanks in advance –  Alejandro May 20 '12 at 1:34
    
Could you post your updated code? –  Scott Hunter May 20 '12 at 1:56
    
Sure Mr @ScottHunter I posted it with all the comments, on this post, update. ` void ReadData(int & A, int row, int col) { int i,j; ifstream REL1; REL1.open ("REL"); for(i=0;i<row;i++) { for(j=0;j<col;j++) { REL1 >> A[i][j]; } } REL1.close(); } void Display(int **& A, int row, int col) { int i,j; for(i=0;i<row;i++) { for(j=0;j<col;j++) { cout << A[i][j] << "\t "; } cout << endl; } }` **REL file is on the original post and TR file only contain 46. Thanks in advance –  Alejandro May 20 '12 at 2:03
    
@DavidAlejandro Please post the code by updating your original question. Then it will be formatted correctly :) –  Gnosophilon May 20 '12 at 7:42
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