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#!/bin/bash 


echo "please enter a path where to search:"
read myPath

touch --date "2012-01-01" /tmp/start
touch --date "2012-01-01" /tmp/end

until  [ "$myPath" = $(pwd) ] 
do
echo "please enter a correct path where to search:"
read myPath
done


RESULT= "$(find  $HOME "-type -f" -newer /tmp/start -not -newer tmp/end)"

echo $RESULT

When I'm trying to execute it I'm getting:

find: Arguments to -type should contain only one letter
TimeStamp: line 17: : command not found
share|improve this question
1  
You almost certainly want /tmp/end rather than tmp/end –  Keith Thompson May 20 '12 at 0:46
2  
There can't be a space after the equal sign in the assignment to RESULT. In the find and echo statements, the variables should be quoted: find "$HOME" ... and echo "$RESULT". There's nothing in what you've posted that would give the "command not found" error. You prompt for myPath then force it to equal pwd then don't use it, but use $HOME instead. This doesn't make any sense. You don't need the first echo and read since the until loop will do what you want. Having /tmp/start and /tmp/end have the same date doesn't make any sense. –  Dennis Williamson May 20 '12 at 2:01
2  
Some versions of find allow you to supply a date as an argument so you don't need temporary files for comparison. The title of your question is friendly but it tells nothing about the question. –  Dennis Williamson May 20 '12 at 2:01

3 Answers 3

For starters, why do you have -type -f outside the quotes? And it's -type f not -type -f (no dash before the f)

Try this:

"$(find $HOME -type f -newer /tmp/start -not -newer tmp/end)"
share|improve this answer
1  
It's not outside the quotes. Inside $() there's a new quoting context. So the $() is inside the outer set of quotes and the -type f is inside the inner set of quotes. –  Dennis Williamson May 20 '12 at 1:51
    
Thank you so much!!!! , the -f was the case –  lnotik May 20 '12 at 9:36
    
changed to f works like magic –  lnotik May 20 '12 at 9:36
    
Cool. "Accept" this answer then (click the hollow tick mark to the left) –  Bohemian May 20 '12 at 10:51

I would try this:

"$(find $HOME -type f -newer /tmp/start -not -newer tmp/end)"
share|improve this answer

You have:

RESULT= "$(find  $HOME "-type -f" -newer /tmp/start -not -newer tmp/end)"

find: Arguments to -type should contain only one letter

Several things: Remove the quotes around -type -f. I'm not sure why you put them there. The correct argument for the -type parameter should be f and not -f.

TimeStamp: line 17: : command not found

You did a touch on /tmp/end, but you're looking at tmp/end. This is saying the same thing as $PWD/tmp/end. You need a slash at the front to anchor this to the root of the directory structure. You need /tmp/end and not tmp/end.

Try:

RESULT= "$(find "$HOME" -type f -newer /tmp/start -not -newer /tmp/end)"
share|improve this answer
    
thank you all ,changed to echo "please enter a path where to search:" read myPath touch --date "2012-01-01" /tmp/start touch --date "2012-01-01" /tmp/end until [ "$myPath" = "$HOME" ] do echo "please enter a correct path where to search:" read myPath done RESULT="$(find "$HOME" -type -f -newer /tmp/start -not -newer /tmp/end)" echo "$RESULT" but still the same error –  lnotik May 20 '12 at 9:31
    
@user912134 Did you change the -f to f in the -type parameter? –  David W. May 21 '12 at 3:41

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