Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get all the unique combinations of bits(real interesting..I know..zzz). Basically it works well for small numbers like 10 bits with 3 unique or 100 bits and 4 unique. I am testing it at scale but something odd happens when I use 200 bits and 30 items..I get nothing. I've tried to debug the code and can't see why.

I'm using all longs so I'm not sure why, are bits somehow limited or is this a problem with my math? Also, is what I'm doing possible for very large number of bits or is there some limit(i.e. the sun burning out before my program is done)? Ideally I would like to get 30 unique bits from a list of 2000..This approach has been the only that exceeds 100 but I don't know its limit.

Here's the code:

import java.io.BufferedWriter;
import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.SortedMap;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class Combinatorics {

    static final class CombinationsIterator implements Iterator<Long> {
        private int n;
        private int k;
        private long next;

        public CombinationsIterator(int n, int k) {
            this.n = n;
            this.k = k;
            next = (1L << k) - 1;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return (next & (1L << n)) == 0;
        }

        @Override
        public Long next() {
            long result = next;
            long x = next;
            long u = x & -x;
            long v = u + x;
            x = v + (((v ^ x) / u) >> 2);
            next = x;
            return result;
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
    }

    static final class PermutationsIterator implements Iterator<List<Integer>> {
        int n;
        int k;
        int nPk;
        List<Integer> elements;
        int i;
        List<Integer> next;

        public PermutationsIterator(int n, int k) {
            this.n = n;
            this.k = k;

            nPk = permute(n, k);

            List<Integer> elements = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
                elements.add(i);
            this.elements = Collections.unmodifiableList(elements);
        }

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() { return i < nPk; }

        @Override
        public List<Integer> next() {
            List<Integer> next = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            List<Integer> notNext = new ArrayList<Integer>(elements);
            int r = i;
            int np = nPk;
            for (int j = 0; j < k; j++) {
                np /= n - j;
                next.add(notNext.remove(r / np));
                r %= np;
            }
            i++;
            return next;
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() { throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); }
    }

    public static long toCombination(List<Integer> permutation) {
        long combination = 0;
        for (int i : permutation)
            combination |= (1L << i);
        return combination;
    }

    public static List<Integer> toPermutation(long combination) {
        List<Integer> permutation = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        long combinationRemaining = combination;
        int i = 0;
        while (combinationRemaining > 0) {
            if ((combinationRemaining & 1) > 0) {
                permutation.add(i);
            }
            combinationRemaining >>= 1;
            i++;
        }
        return permutation;
    }

    public static SortedMap<Integer, Integer> multiplicitiesOf(List<Integer> multiset) {
        SortedMap<Integer, Integer> multiplicities = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
        for (Integer k : multiset) {
            Integer v = multiplicities.get(k);
            v = (v == null) ? 1 : (v + 1);
            multiplicities.put(k, v);
        }
        return multiplicities;
    }

    public static Iterator<Long> combinationsIterator(int n, int k) {
        return new CombinationsIterator(n, k);
    }

    public static Iterator<List<Integer>> permutationsIterator(int n, int k) {
        return new PermutationsIterator(n, k);
    }

    public static int factorial(int n) {
        int result = 1;
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
            result *= i;
        return result;
    }

    public static int permute(int n, int k) {
        int result = 1;
        for (int i = n - k + 1; i <= n; i++)
            result *= i;
        return result;
    }

    public static int choose(int n, int k) {
        return permute(n, k) / factorial(k);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        System.out.println("Starting");
        for (Iterator<Long> it = combinationsIterator(200, 2); it.hasNext(); ) {
            long next = it.next();
            System.out.format("%d\t%10s\n", next, Long.toBinaryString(next));
        }

    }
}

In the main method changing combinationsIterator(200, 2); generates the strange behavior(10,3 gives the correct result very quickly, even 100,5..but as the number gets higher it just doesn't give results as opposed to taking time to process)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you're using a long, it's limited to 64 bits. But that said, 200 choose 30 will take you -- based on some rough back-of-the-envelope math -- a billion billion millenia to iterate through on a modern PC.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a feeling it was the number of bits...Is there any way to get 200/30 in a reasonable time frame or is it completely impossible? I've tried so many different ways of getting combinations and this seemed to be the most promising because it exceeded 100, but seems like a wall. –  Error_404 May 20 '12 at 0:53
1  
@Error_404 200 choose 30 is an insanely large number. About 4 * 10^35. So yeah, practically impossibly. –  Corbin May 20 '12 at 0:54
1  
@Error_404 200 choose 30 is 409681705022127773530866523638950880, impossible. –  Daniel Fischer May 20 '12 at 0:54
    
Not practical, not even if you had a supercomputer, or 1000 computers to play around with. 200 choose 3 might be feasible, but much farther above that would be ridiculous. –  Louis Wasserman May 20 '12 at 0:58
    
10^7 is typically my rule of thumb for big-O-per-second on a standard PC these days. Google calls that 1.29823071 × 10^18 millenia for 200 choose 30. A billion billion millenia. –  Louis Wasserman May 20 '12 at 1:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.