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A character array is defined globally and a structure with same name is defined within a function. Why sizeof operator returns different values for c & c++ ?

char S[13];
void fun()
{
    struct S
    {
        int v;
    };
    int v1 = sizeof(S);
}

// returns 4 in C++ and 13 in C

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@OliCharlesworth: Compiles fine on my compiler –  Ashwyn May 20 '12 at 2:18
    
@Ashwyn - your compiler compiles without the ; after struct S's declaration? –  birryree May 20 '12 at 2:20
    
@OliCharlesworth: oops sorry! forgot to write that, actually I wrote that code, instead of copy pasting! –  Ashwyn May 20 '12 at 2:24
3  
I think the best answer in general is "Because C and C++ are different languages." –  R.. May 20 '12 at 3:18
1  
You might also be interested in stackoverflow.com/questions/2038200/… to see other silent differences between C and C++. –  jamesdlin May 20 '12 at 3:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Because in C++, the struct you defined is named S, while in C, it's named struct S (which is why you often see typedef struct used in C code). If you were to change the code to the following, you would get the expected results:

char S[13];
void fun()
{
    typedef struct tagS
    {
        int v;
    } S;
    int v1 = sizeof(S);
}
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1  
It is a bad idea to use names starting with an underscore followed by an uppercase letter, because those names are reserved for the implementation. –  FredOverflow May 20 '12 at 8:04
    
Fair enough. Modified slightly (not that it matters a whole lot for the sake of the example.) –  Adam Maras May 20 '12 at 16:53

In C, to refer to the struct type, you need to say struct S. Therefore, sizeof(S) refers to the array.

In C++, struct is unnecessary. So the local S hides the global S.

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