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I have a socket server, everytime a new connection is made, a XClient class is instantiated and I am inserting it into a map. I am watching the memory usage through task manager. everytime a new connection is made, lets assume, the memory usage of my program increases by 800kb for example. Inside that class, there is a connected variable, which will tell me wheter this client is active or not. I created a thread to run endlessly and iterate through all the elements of my map and I'm checking if the connected variable is true or false. if it is false, I am (at least I think I am...) releasing the memory used by the previously instantiated XClient class. BUT, the memory usage is being decreased only half of the 800kb (for example, no precise values). So, when a client connects: +800kb. when client disconnects: -400kb. I think I have a memory leak? If I have 100 clients connected, that 400kb that is not being released would turn into 4000kb of non-used(?) memory, and that would be a problem.

So, here is my code. The thread to iterate through all elements:

DWORD Update(XSockets *sockets)
{
while(true)
{
    for(sockets->it = sockets->clients.begin(); sockets->it != sockets->clients.end(); sockets->it++)
    {
        int key = (*sockets->it).first;
        if(sockets->clients[key]->connected == false) // remove the client, releasing memory
        {
            delete sockets->clients[key];
        }
    }
    Sleep(100);
}
return true;
}

The code that is adding new XClients instances to my map:

bool XSockets::AcceptConnections()
{
struct sockaddr_in from;

while(true)
{
    try
    {
        int fromLen = sizeof(from);
        SOCKET client = accept(this->loginSocket,(struct sockaddr*)&from,&fromLen);
        if(client != INVALID_SOCKET)
        {
            srand(time(NULL));
            int clientKey = rand();
            XClient* clientClass = new XClient(inet_ntoa(from.sin_addr),clientKey,client);
            this->clients.insert(make_pair(clientKey,clientClass));
        }
        Sleep(100);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        printf("error accepting incoming connection!\r\n");
        break;
    }
}

closesocket(this->loginSocket);
WSACleanup();

return true;
}

And the declarations:

    map<int,XClient*> clients;
map<int,XClient*>::iterator it;
share|improve this question
    
Check XClient::~XClient() (the destructor) to make sure it properly releases everything. –  Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 2:41
    
I added a printf in the destructor, but it seems like the destructor is not being called... –  Leandro Battochio May 20 '12 at 2:43
1  
printf is not a reliable way to debug. Try a breakpoint. –  anthony-arnold May 20 '12 at 2:45
    
I also notice that your code doesn't remove the entry from the map after deleting it. So you'll read the connected member variable of a deleted object, and call delete on the same pointer multiple times, with all kinds of bad behavior. –  Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 2:46
    
my bad, printf is working in the destructor fine. so, how should I remove the entry in the map correctly? –  Leandro Battochio May 20 '12 at 2:48

3 Answers 3

Are you using c++11 or Boost? To avoid memory leak nightmares like this, you could create a map of shared pointers. This way, you can let the structure clean itself up.

This is how I would do it:

#include <memory>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <mutex>

typedef std::shared_ptr<XClient> XClientPtr;
std::map<int, XClientPtr> client;
std::mutex the_lock;

bool XSockets::AcceptConnections()
{
/* snip */

    auto clientClass = std::make_shared<XClient>(/*... params ...*/);
    the_lock.lock();
    clients[clientKey] = clientClass;
    the_lock.unlock();
/* snip */
}

bool client_is_connected(const std::pair<int, XClientPtr> &p) {
    return p.second->connected;
}

DWORD Update(XSockets *sockets) {
    while(true) { /* You should probably have some kind of
                     exit condition here. Like a global "running" bool
                     so that the thread will eventually stop. */
        the_lock.lock();

        auto it = sockets->clients.begin(), end = sockets->clients.end();
        for(; it != end; ) {
            if (!it->second->connected)
                //Clients will be destructed here if their refcount goes to 0
                sockets->clients.erase(it++); 
            else
                ++it;
        }
        the_lock.unlock();
        Sleep(100);
    }
    return 1;
}

Note: Above code is untested. I haven't even tried to compile it.

share|improve this answer
    
Somehow, I can't include the mutex header: no such file or directory –  Leandro Battochio May 20 '12 at 3:15
    
Probably not part of your compiler's standard library. But you get the point. You're using winapi by the looks of it. Try the techniques defined in InitializeCriticalSection and related documentation. –  anthony-arnold May 20 '12 at 3:17
    
I cant include all the headers you provided: algorithm,functional and memory. If I add the functional header, my VS 2010 shows a lot of errors... –  Leandro Battochio May 20 '12 at 3:26
    
What's up with your VS2010? It should include all of those headers. In fact, those headers are old by C++ standards. Is your environment broken? Are you using native C++ or Managed? –  anthony-arnold May 21 '12 at 2:35
1  
Well done! Lesson learned? Don't use namespace std in a using directive. What's on that line, XClient.h:29? –  anthony-arnold May 23 '12 at 22:05

You've got several problems, but the chief one is that you appear to be sharing a map between threads without any synchronization at all. That can lead to all kinds of trouble.

share|improve this answer
    
only the Update method is running under a thread. or it doesnt matter? –  Leandro Battochio May 20 '12 at 2:55
    
You have > 1 thread (i.e. the main thread counts as 1). You need synchronisation. –  anthony-arnold May 20 '12 at 3:10

See What happens to an STL iterator after erasing it in VS, UNIX/Linux?. In your case, you are not deleting everything, so you will want to not use a for loop.

sockets->it = sockets->clients.begin();
while (sockets->it != sockets->clients.end())
{
    int key = (*sockets->it).first;
    if(sockets->clients[key]->connected == false) // remove the client, releasing memory
    {
        delete sockets->clients[key];
        sockets->clients.erase(sockets->it++);
    }
    else
    {
        sockets->it++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Couldn't you just use it->second instead of clients[key]? –  Ben Voigt May 20 '12 at 3:28
    
Yes, but I wanted to make as few changes as possible to his code. –  Jeffery Thomas May 20 '12 at 3:40

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