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What I have been trying to do is patch or merge the differences in the android kernel to a linux kernel for a specific board. I am having trouble successfully merging the 2 though. I have tried to merge the kernel using these commands to make a patch file: 1st: I tried to find the point in time where the vanilla linux kernel was merged with the android tree.

 git log --pretty=oneline --format="%Cgreen%h %Creset%s" \
            --grep="Linux 3." -n 20 

Then I make the patch:

git diff c16fa4f HEAD > 3.4-to-android.patch

The patch was huge ~200MB , But when I apply the patch I get a long string of errors. I am following this site: http://blogs.arm.com/software-enablement/498-from-zero-to-boot-porting-android-to-your-arm-platform/

I appreciate any help you may have. (Just trying to learn something new. :-) )

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I have been told that the only difference between the Android kernel and the linux kernel is the wakelock –  L7ColWinters May 20 '12 at 3:27
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@L7ColWinters that is only one difference among many. Most would probably name Binder and ashmem as being even more critical. For an out-of-date list see elinux.org/Android_Kernel_Features –  Chris Stratton May 20 '12 at 3:34
    
@user1232264 is Linux 2.6.38 an appropriate starting point for you? What version is your kernel for your board? What is the head of the tree you are trying to extract from? As a guess, you've diff'd a 3.x Android kernel against the 2.6.38 mainline, and that's why you got a huge result, or something similar where the bulk of your diff has nothing to do with what androidifies a kernel. –  Chris Stratton May 20 '12 at 3:37
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@user1232264 I see you have edited your post to change the search term, but you've still given the same 521cb40 which is Linux 2.6.38 in your diff command (I doubt you've yet re-run the entire experiment). Try updating that to one of the 3.x points found from your search. –  Chris Stratton May 20 '12 at 4:01
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In my experience, you will have little luck doing it like that. You should apply individual patches taken from an Android git tree, not everything as a single patch. This way you have a chance of understanding what's going on and manually merge what doesn't apply cleanly while having the appropriate context. –  Torp Jan 17 at 16:24

1 Answer 1

There are lots of differences between Android kernel and Vanilla kernel:

http://www.linaro.org/blog/android-blog/androidization-of-linux-kernel/

CONFIG_ASHMEM=y
CONFIG_STAGING=y
CONFIG_ANDROID=y
CONFIG_ANDROID_BINDER_IPC=y
CONFIG_ANDROID_LOGGER=y
CONFIG_ANDROID_RAM_CONSOLE=y
CONFIG_ANDROID_LOW_MEMORY_KILLER=y

To overcome a lot of the IPC problems, Android does not have any of the normal IPC mechanism (and so the kernel does not implement it) found in normal Linux: shared memory, named pipes, semaphores etc. All of these can be done just by Android BINDER instead.

Here is another link that shows the porting logic:

http://community.arm.com/groups/android-community/blog/2013/09/18/from-zero-to-boot-porting-android-to-your-arm-platform

There is another effort to build Android compability layer in vanilla kernel (like Ubuntu / Fedora etc) so that you can play with the Android Apps on your PC:

https://lkml.org/lkml/2013/12/4/469

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