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What is the correct way to declare a multidimensional array and assign values to it?

This is what I have:

int x = 5;
int y = 5;

String[][] myStringArray = new String [x][y];

myStringArray[0][x] = "a string";
myStringArray[0][y] = "another string";
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7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Try replacing the appropriate lines with:

myStringArray[0][x-1] = "a string";
myStringArray[0][y-1] = "another string";

Your code is incorrect because the sub-arrays have a length of y, and indexing starts at 0. So setting to myStringArray[0][y] or myStringArray[0][x] will fail because the indices x and y are out of bounds.

String[][] myStringArray = new String [x][y]; is the correct way to initialise a rectangular multidimensional array. If you want it to be jagged (each sub-array potentially has a different length) then you can use code similar to this answer. Note however that John's assertion that you have to create the sub-arrays manually is incorrect in the case where you want a perfectly rectangular multidimensional array.

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Ooh, did not know that! Oops. –  John Kugelman Jul 1 '09 at 3:35

Java doesn't have "true" multidimensional arrays.

An array accessed like arr[i][j][k] is simply an array, of arrays, of arrays.

So, if you know how arrays work, you know how multidimensional arrays work.


Declaration:

int[][][] threeDimArr = new int[4][5][6];

or, with initialization:

int[][][] threeDimArr = { { { 1, 2 }, { 3, 4 } }, { { 5, 6 }, { 7, 8 } } };

Access:

int x = threeDimArr[1][0][1];

or

int[][] row = threeDimArr[1];

String representation:

Arrays.deepToString(threeDimArr);

yields

"[[[1, 2], [3, 4]], [[5, 6], [7, 8]]]"
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1  
How is that not a "true" multidimensional array? –  dhardy Feb 27 '13 at 12:35
7  
With "true" multidimensional arrays I refer to "non-jagged" arrays. For the difference between jagged arrays and "true" multidimensional arrays, see this question. –  aioobe Feb 27 '13 at 13:08

You can also use the following construct:

   String[][] myStringArray = new String [][] { { "X0", "Y0"},
                                                { "X1", "Y1"},
                                                { "X2", "Y2"},
                                                { "X3", "Y3"},
                                                { "X4", "Y4"} };
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+1 because this is actually what I was looking for. –  Reimius Mar 18 '13 at 20:05

You can declare multi dimensional arrays like :

// 4 x 5 String arrays, all Strings are null
// [0] -> [null,null,null,null,null]
// [1] -> [null,null,null,null,null]
// [2] -> [null,null,null,null,null]
// [3] -> [null,null,null,null,null]

String[][] sa1 = new String[4][5];
for(int i = 0; i < sa1.length; i++) {           // sa1.length == 4
    for (int j = 0; j < sa1[i].length; j++) {     //sa1[i].length == 5
        sa1[i][j] = "new String value";
    }
}


// 5 x 0  All String arrays are null
// [null]
// [null]
// [null]
// [null]
// [null]
String[][] sa2 = new String[5][];
for(int i = 0; i < sa2.length; i++) {
    String[] anon = new String[ /* your number here */];
    // or String[] anon = new String[]{"I'm", "a", "new", "array"};
    sa2[i] = anon;
}

// [0] -> ["I'm","in","the", "0th", "array"]
// [1] -> ["I'm", "in", "another"]
String[][] sa3 = new String[][]{ {"I'm","in","the", "0th", "array"},{"I'm", "in", "another"}};
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I'll add that if you want to read the dimensions, you can do this:

int[][][] a = new int[4][3][2];

System.out.println(a.length);  // 4
System.out.println(a[0].length); // 3
System.out.println(a[0][0].length); //2

You can also have jagged arrays, where different rows have different lengths, so a[0].length != a[1].length.

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Multidimensional Array in Java

Returning a multidimensional array

Java does not truely support multidimensional arrays. In Java, a two-dimensional array is simply an array of arrays, a three-dimensional array is an array of arrays of arrays, a four-dimensional array is an array of arrays of arrays of arrays, and so on...

We can define a two-dimensional array as:

  1. int[ ] num[ ] = {{1,2}, {1,2}, {1,2}, {1,2}}
  2. int[ ][ ] num = new int[4][2]

    num[0][0] = 1;
    num[0][1] = 2;
    num[1][0] = 1;
    num[1][1] = 2;
    num[2][0] = 1;
    num[2][1] = 2;
    num[3][0] = 1;
    num[3][1] = 2;
    

    If you don't allocate, let's say num[2][1], it is not initialized and then it is automatically allocated 0, that is, automatically num[2][1] = 0;

  3. Below, num1.length gives you rows.

  4. While num1[0].length gives you the number of elements related to num1[0]. Here num1[0] has related arrays num1[0][0] and num[0][1] only.
  5. Here we used a for loop which helps us to calculate num1[i].length. Here i is incremented through a loop.

    class array
    {
        static int[][] add(int[][] num1,int[][] num2)
        {
            int[][] temp = new int[num1.length][num1[0].length];
            for(int i = 0; i<temp.length; i++)
            {
                for(int j = 0; j<temp[i].length; j++)
                {
                    temp[i][j] = num1[i][j]+num2[i][j];
                }
            }
            return temp;
        }
    
        public static void main(String args[])
        {
            /* We can define a two-dimensional array as
                 1.  int[] num[] = {{1,2},{1,2},{1,2},{1,2}}
                 2.  int[][] num = new int[4][2]
                     num[0][0] = 1;
                     num[0][1] = 2;
                     num[1][0] = 1;
                     num[1][1] = 2;
                     num[2][0] = 1;
                     num[2][1] = 2;
                     num[3][0] = 1;
                     num[3][1] = 2;
    
                     If you don't allocate let's say num[2][1] is
                     not initialized, and then it is automatically
                     allocated 0, that is, automatically num[2][1] = 0;
                  3. Below num1.length gives you rows
                  4. While num1[0].length gives you number of elements
                     related to num1[0]. Here num1[0] has related arrays
                     num1[0][0] and num[0][1] only.
                  5. Here we used a 'for' loop which helps us to calculate
                     num1[i].length, and here i is incremented through a loop.
            */
            int num1[][] = {{1,2},{1,2},{1,2},{1,2}};
            int num2[][] = {{1,2},{1,2},{1,2},{1,2}};
    
            int num3[][] = add(num1,num2);
            for(int i = 0; i<num1.length; i++)
            {
                for(int j = 0; j<num1[j].length; j++)
                    System.out.println("num3[" + i + "][" + j + "]=" + num3[i][j]);
            }
        }
    }
    
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Or you could even do this:

 int[][][][][][][][][][][][][]

:) but that would waste a lot of memory

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