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I found this code online that has a procedure inside a procedure. I cannot understand why the author would have chosen to write it this way. What I do notice is a recursive function being executed.

Why did he not separate the procedures like most code I have seen.

His implementation:

 procedure XML2Form(tree : TJvPageListTreeView; XMLDoc : TXMLDocument);
 var
iNode : IXMLNode;

 procedure ProcessNode(
    Node : IXMLNode; 
    tn   : TTreeNode);
 var
cNode : IXMLNode;
begin
if Node = nil then Exit;
with Node do
begin
  tn := tree.Items.AddChild(tn, Attributes['text']);
  tn.ImageIndex := Integer(Attributes['imageIndex']);
  tn.StateIndex := Integer(Attributes['stateIndex']);
 end;

cNode := Node.ChildNodes.First;
while cNode <> nil do
begin
  ProcessNode(cNode, tn);
  cNode := cNode.NextSibling;
end;
end; (*ProcessNode*) 
begin
tree.Items.Clear;
XMLDoc.FileName := ChangeFileExt(ParamStr(0),'.XML');
XMLDoc.Active := True;

iNode := XMLDoc.DocumentElement.ChildNodes.First;

while iNode <> nil do
begin
ProcessNode(iNode,nil);
iNode := iNode.NextSibling;
end;
XMLDoc.Active := False;
end;


procedure Form2XML(tree: TJVPageListTreeView);
var
tn : TTreeNode;
XMLDoc : TXMLDocument;
iNode : IXMLNode;

procedure ProcessTreeItem(
    tn    : TTreeNode;
    iNode : IXMLNode);
var
cNode : IXMLNode;
begin
if (tn = nil) then Exit;
cNode := iNode.AddChild('item');
cNode.Attributes['text'] := tn.Text;
cNode.Attributes['imageIndex'] := tn.ImageIndex;
cNode.Attributes['stateIndex'] := tn.StateIndex;
cNode.Attributes['selectedIndex'] := tn.SelectedIndex;


//child nodes
tn := tn.getFirstChild;
while tn <> nil do
begin
  ProcessTreeItem(tn, cNode);
  tn := tn.getNextSibling;
end;
end; (*ProcessTreeItem*)
begin
XMLDoc := TXMLDocument.Create(nil);
XMLDoc.Active := True;
iNode := XMLDoc.AddChild('tree2xml');
iNode.Attributes['app'] := ParamStr(0);

tn := tree.TopItem;
while tn <> nil do
begin
ProcessTreeItem (tn, iNode);

tn := tn.getNextSibling;
end;

XMLDoc.SaveToFile(ChangeFileExt(ParamStr(0),'.XML'));
XMLDoc := nil;
end; (* Tree2XML *)

or modified implementation:

procedure ProcessNode(Node : IXMLNode; tn : TTreeNode);
var
cNode : IXMLNode;
begin
if Node = nil then Exit;
with Node do
begin
  tn := tree.Items.AddChild(tn, Attributes['text']);
  tn.ImageIndex := Integer(Attributes['imageIndex']);
  tn.StateIndex := Integer(Attributes['stateIndex']);
 end;

cNode := Node.ChildNodes.First;
while cNode <> nil do
begin
  ProcessNode(cNode, tn);
  cNode := cNode.NextSibling;
end;
end; (*ProcessNode*)


 procedure ProcessTreeItem(tn : TTreeNode; iNode : IXMLNode);
 var
 cNode : IXMLNode;
  begin
 if (tn = nil) then Exit;
cNode := iNode.AddChild('item');
cNode.Attributes['text'] := tn.Text;
cNode.Attributes['imageIndex'] := tn.ImageIndex;
cNode.Attributes['stateIndex'] := tn.StateIndex;
cNode.Attributes['selectedIndex'] := tn.SelectedIndex;

//child nodes
tn := tn.getFirstChild;
while tn <> nil do
begin
  ProcessTreeItem(tn, cNode);
  tn := tn.getNextSibling;
end;
end; (*ProcessTreeItem*)


procedure XML2Form(tree : TJvPageListTreeView; XMLDoc : TXMLDocument);
var
iNode : IXMLNode;
begin
tree.Items.Clear;
XMLDoc.FileName := ChangeFileExt(ParamStr(0),'.XML');
XMLDoc.Active := True;

iNode := XMLDoc.DocumentElement.ChildNodes.First;

while iNode <> nil do
begin
ProcessNode(iNode,nil);
iNode := iNode.NextSibling;
end;
XMLDoc.Active := False;
end;

procedure Form2XML(tree: TJVPageListTreeView);
var
tn : TTreeNode;
XMLDoc : TXMLDocument;
iNode : IXMLNode;
begin
XMLDoc := TXMLDocument.Create(nil);
XMLDoc.Active := True;
iNode := XMLDoc.AddChild('tree2xml');
iNode.Attributes['app'] := ParamStr(0);

tn := tree.TopItem;
while tn <> nil do
begin
ProcessTreeItem (tn, iNode);

tn := tn.getNextSibling;
end;

XMLDoc.SaveToFile(ChangeFileExt(ParamStr(0),'.XML'));
XMLDoc := nil;
end; (* Tree2XML *)
share|improve this question
4  
This question boils down to "Why is Pascal like pascal, and not like C?". :-) Nevertheless I am not voting to close as it's a legitimate new-user question. –  Warren P May 20 '12 at 13:02
2  
Why would you declare variables in your procedure instead of making them global? I use this reasoning to sometimes use procedures in my procedures, to not have another global. –  Pieter B May 21 '12 at 9:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Nested procedures like that do make sense in this XML related code. To process all nodes, a recursive call of ProcessNode is needed. You have to note that sometimes, inner functions need to access a lot more data than a few parameters.

Potential implementations may be:

  • Use "flat" procedures, as in your implementation;
  • Use "nested" procedures, as in the original implementation;
  • Create a dedicated class (or record + methods) which will remain private to the implementation part of the unit.

Of course, the 3rd option sounds the more maintainable. It will allow clear separation of the process, and allow the use of variables local to their methods. Using a record (or an object for older versions of Delphi) will allow the processing object to be allocated on the stack of the main procedure, so you won't need to write Obj := TInterType.Create; try .. finally Obj.Free. But if you use an object please note that some new version of Delphi has compilation issue - you should better use record with methods.

The "flat" procedure style is IMHO not better than "nested" procedure, and even worse, since it would need to add additional parameters to the inner calls, or use some global variables. By the way, having a lot of variables for every call will increase stack space, and reduce speed.

The "nested" style is in fact OOP oriented. When an inner function is called, the compiler pass the caller stack base in a register to the nested function (just like the additional self parameter of an object). So the inner function is able to access all the caller stack variables, just as if they were declared in a private object (the 3rd solution).

The Delphi IDE and internal debugger handles nested procedures quite well. IMHO it could make sense for some small piece of code (that is, something that can be read on the same screen height). Then, when you need more process, a dedicated record/object with methods and explicit variables will be more maintainable. But the "flat" option is IMHO not to be coded.

I've just written a blog article about these implementation patterns, which will present some source code of a QuickSort implementation, which will use as little stack space as possible, and will avoid a call to a nested procedure inside a procedure, and use a dedicated private object instead.

In all cases, do not be afraid of creating some internal objects/classes to implement your algorithms. The latest versions of Delphi allows even private types in class definition - but sometimes, I feel more comfortable with making the internal object totally private to the implementation part of the unit, i.e. non even appearing as private members of the interface part of the unit.

Classes are not only meant for publishing your process outside of the unit: OOP applies also to implementation patterns. Your code will be more maintainable, and in most case, the self parameter will be used to refer to all associated data at once, so your code may also be even faster and lighter!

share|improve this answer

Nested procedures / functions have been available in Delphi long before OOP hast been added to it. That all happened around 25 years ago. Back in those times, local functions inside a function helped to keep to global scope cleaner and related code closer together. Borland / Inprise / Embarcadero never dropped that feature, of course because otherwise they would have created a huge incompatibility. So use it if it makes sense to you, otherwise just let it be.

share|improve this answer
    
Please try to format an answer so that it becomes more readable. –  Naddy Dec 21 '13 at 19:51

Coding with inner procedures like that is a matter of style. One could argue that it's "cleaner" ...in the same sense of encapsulating all the related data and routines inside one thingy as one hears about for "object-oriented programming" ...but it also has disadvantages: more difficult to code correctly initially, harder to test, harder for many programmers to understand (and thus possibly less maintainable).

Defining an inner procedure keeps future programmers from accidentally calling the inner procedure and expecting it to do something reasonable. That inner procedure isn't even defined -hence can't be called- at an outer/global level.

Defining an inner procedure also means less chance of a name collision in the outer/global namespace, since the inner routine doesn't contribute anything to that namespace. (This is an excellent example: how many different things all named "ProcessNode(...)" are likely?)

And as noted, in most languages the inner routine has "special" access to what would otherwise be invisible local data types and variables.

share|improve this answer

There's one problem with your revised version: it references tree, which is a parameter to the main method. That's one thing that can be accomplished with nested procedures: they can access any variable from outer scopes that's been declared so far.

Having said that, a lot of developers find nested procedures to be a messy coding style and prefer to avoid it; they'd generally rewrite it like you did, but add tree as another parameter to ProcessNode.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I don't find nested procedures messy, unless they are long, a small recursive procedure is worth a trillion bux! (: –  ComputerSaysNo May 20 '12 at 11:33
3  
Some people like to hide things that shouldn't be callable outside the context they were designed to be used from. This kind of "hiding" is not only found in objects (with private/protected) it's also a reason for nested procedures, and is the reason (structure programming) that Wirth put the feature into the language in the first place. One can accomplish most of that purpose by making a non-local function that is only used and declared in the implementation section, and then, all you lose is the ability to share local scope. –  Warren P May 20 '12 at 13:00

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