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I'm having difficulties returning a typed List. For some reason it is returned as a raw List though I'd really like to get the typed one.

It has to do with the class abstraction. By adding/removing the abstract keyword on the class, my List changes from raw to typed and vice versa. Seems like it's downcasting my generic because of the abstraction?

public abstract class Notice<T> {
    public List<Contact> contacts;

    public List<Contact> getContacts()
    {
            return this.contacts;
    }
}


public class Contact {
}

public class Service {
    public Service(Notice notice) {
        // ! Would like to use List<Contact> here, as I defined in Notice !
        List contacts = notice.getContacts();       
    }
}

How can I solve this, and why does it happen. I tried Java Generics FAQ etc.

Updated code; FacebookMessengerService

public class FacebookMessengerService extends MessengerService<FacebookNotice> {
    public void send(FacebookNotice notice)
    {
        //
        // ERROR occurs here:
        // "Type mismatch: cannot convert from element type Object to Contact"
        //
        // Also, hovering over it tells me to be just a rawtyped List instead of List<Contact>
        //

        for (Contact contact : notice.getContacts())
        {
            // ..
        }       
    }
}

MessengerService

public abstract class MessengerService<T extends Notice> implements IMessengerService<T> {
}

IMessengerService

public interface IMessengerService<T extends Notice> {
    public void send(T notice);
}

FacebookEventInvitationNotice

public class FacebookEventInvitationNotice extends FacebookNotice<EventInvitation> {    
    public FacebookEventInvitationNotice(EventInvitation trigger) {
        super(trigger);
    }
}

FacebookNotice

public abstract class FacebookNotice<T extends Trigger> extends Notice<T> {
    public static FacebookMessengerService service = new FacebookMessengerService();

    public FacebookNotice(T trigger) {
        super(trigger);
    }


    public void send()
    {
        service.send(this);
    }
}

Notice

public abstract class Notice<T extends Trigger> implements INotice<T> 
{
    public List<Contact> contacts = new ArrayList<Contact>();
    public T trigger;


    public Notice(T trigger)
    {
        this.trigger = trigger;
    }


    public void addContact(Contact contact)
    {
        this.contacts.add(contact);
    }


    public List<Contact> getContacts()
    {
        return this.contacts;
    }
}

INotice

public interface INotice<T extends Trigger> {
    public void send();
}

EventInvitation

public class EventInvitation extends Trigger {
    private Event event;


    public EventInvitation(Event event)
    {
        this.event = event;
    }


    public Event getEvent()
    {
        return this.event;
    }

}

Trigger

public class Trigger {
    public List<Notice> notices = new ArrayList<Notice>();
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to be full generic:

public class Service {
    public Service(Notice<?> notice) {
        List<Contact> contacts = notice.getContacts();       
    }
}
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Change List to List<Contact> in your above code (in Service), and it definitely compiles (I've just verified it). What problem do you have exactly? What's the exact and complete error message of the compiler? –  JB Nizet May 20 '12 at 6:52
1  
I repeat. Show us your real code (or at least minimal code that exhibits the problem), and tell us the complete and exact error message you get from the compiler. –  JB Nizet May 20 '12 at 6:55
    
I just added all the code I could think of to be relevant –  Robert de W May 20 '12 at 7:55
    
I can see your point, as "public void send(FacebookNotice notice)" is not the right typed signature for "public abstract class FacebookNotice<T extends Trigger>". –  Robert de W May 20 '12 at 8:27
1  
It's surprising, but that's how it is. When you're using a generic type as a raw type, you basically say to the compiler: I don't care about generics here. And everything becomes raw type, even if it doesn't have any relation with the "forgotten" type. –  JB Nizet May 20 '12 at 9:11
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By changing my code as suggested to:

public class FacebookMessengerService extends MessengerService<FacebookNotice<?>> {
    public void send(FacebookNotice<?> notice)
    {
        for (Contact contact : notice.getContacts())
        {

        }       
    }
}

My problem seems to be solved! Still, I don't see how the difference in FacebookNotice and FacebookNotice<?> could force my List<Contact> to become rawtyped List?

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