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Here is my code;

<script type="text/javascript">
function submitform()
{
$.post("handlers/request.php");

}                       
</script>

<form action="handlers/request.php" method="post" data-ajax="false" id="request">
<a href="javascript: submitform()">
<input type="hidden" name="url" value="http://google.com" />
</a>
</form>

In a separate PHP file (handers/request.php) I have a simple:

$url = $_POST['url'];

It isn't picking this up. Why not?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not actually passing any data through.

$.post("handlers/request.php", { url: $("[name='url']").val() }, function(data){
  console.log( data );
});

Note the second parameter, it's an object which will carry our values over to the server-side PHP script. The url key will become $_POST['url'] on the server-end, and will contain our value from the [name='url'] form input.

Additionally, when binding this functionality to an anchor-click, avoid the following:

<a href="javascript: submitform()">

Instead, go with something more along the lines of:

<a class="submit" href="enablejs.html">Submit</a>

Then, within your JavaScript:

$(function(){
  $("form#request").on("click", "a.submit", function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $.post("handlers/request.php", { url: $("[name='url']").val() }, function(data){
      console.log( data );
    });
  });
});

It's always good to keep your JavaScript out of your HTML.

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When you need to pass multiple variables does it look like this? $.post("handlers/request.php", { url: $("[name='url']").val(), title: $("[name='title']").val() }, function(data){ console.log( data ); –  Chris Olson May 21 '12 at 18:16
    
@ChrisOlson Yes, your data object is constructed of keys and values, like this { key: 'value', otherKey: 5 }. –  Jonathan Sampson May 21 '12 at 19:13

On a simple level, you need to:

  • pass some data to the Ajax page, which your code doesn't.
  • decide what to do once your data has been passed.

The syntax for $.post goes like:

jQuery.post( url [, data] [, success(data, textStatus, jqXHR)] [, dataType] )

so it would be:

$.post("test.php", { name: "John", time: "2pm" } );

to pass simple JavaScript variables, or:

$.post("test.php", $("#request").serialize());

to pass a whole form with id "request", like yours. You need to specify a callback function if your test.php page returns some code.

Besides, your implementation of the HTML is somewhat messy. There's no sense in putting a hidden input in an A tag. Try something like:

<form action="handlers/request.php" method="post" data-ajax="false" id="request">
    <input type="hidden" name="url" value="http://google.com" />
    <input type="button" onclick="submitform();" value="Submit" />
</form>

function submitform() {
    $.post("handlers/request.php", $("#request").serialize());
}
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