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Ok. Let me start again. I am trying to write a program that would evaluate reverse Polish notation arguments to it. (i.e. ./program 2 4 +, which evaluates to 6).

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{
   char oper[MAXOP];
   char *ptr;
   unsigned char c;
   double op2;
   while (--argc > 0 && ++argv != NULL) {
     ptr =  oper;
     if (isdigit(c = **argv)) 
     {
        while (isdigit(c = **argv++)) 
        {
            *ptr++ = c;
        }
        *ptr = '\0';
        push(atof(oper));
     } 
     else if (isalpha(c)) 
     {  
        while (isalpha(c = **argv++)) 
        {
            *ptr++ = c;
        }
                   ...
         ...
    }
}

The program should check the first character of each arguments if it is alpha or digit or an operator but it always turns out to be an alpha.

+++++++++ UPDATE +++++++++++++

Well, that's odd. It is now working. Before the condition, isdigit(c = **argv) wasn't evaluating to true for numeric arguments (didn't matter if the rest of the code was wrong). Now it does, but the condition isdigit(c = **argv++) is wrong.

It should be isdigit(c = *argv[0]++).

I had two files of the same name. They were in different directories but contain the same code. While working with this one, I must have been in the other directory and compiling the other file, and thus getting the same output despite edits to this one. My bad.

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2  
This code simply hurts my eyes. Move all the cruft side effects out of the conditions and ask again. But what was your question? –  Jens Gustedt May 20 '12 at 7:09
1  
Really, nobody should write code like that. –  zmbq May 20 '12 at 7:10
1  
i don't think **argv++ does what you think it does (which is one reason why you should probably use simpler operations). –  Michael Burr May 20 '12 at 7:14
    
Aside from the suggestion that you look at the **argv++ operations, since they're almost certainly wrong, it will be hard for anyone to help you figure out what's wrong with your code, since you don't tell us what it's supposed to do. –  Michael Burr May 20 '12 at 7:32
    
Don't try to do so much in one line. Something like isalpha(c = **argv++) should be broken to lines, each doing one thing (advance argv, get the character, check if it's a letter). Then you can debug (with a debugger or just printf) to see which step went wrong. –  ugoren May 20 '12 at 8:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you tried using a debugger and figuring out what happens?

My first guess would be that **argv++ is wrong (are you increasing argv? *argv? **argv? Even if it's not wrong, it's just confusing code). Switch to:

char *cur_arg = *argv;

And go over cur_arg (using cur_arg++ to get to the next character, and not c=*cur_arg++ - again, confusing code).

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#define MAXOP 16

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char oper[MAXOP];
    char *ptr;
    unsigned char c;
    double op2;

    while(--argc > 0 && ++argv != NULL) {
        ptr = oper;
        if(isdigit(c = **argv)){
            while(isdigit(c = *(*argv)++)){
                *ptr++ = c;
            }
            *ptr = '\0';
            printf("DEBUG:%s\n", oper);
        } else if(ispunct(c)){//isalpha is alphabet check , '+' does not fit.
            while(ispunct(c = *(*argv)++)){
                *ptr++ = c;
            }
            *ptr = '\0';
            printf("DEBUG:%s\n", oper);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
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